Hudson Valley Writers Guild Newsletter, September 2015

IN THIS ISSUE

Guild Announcements:

  • Community of Writers Reading September 13

Member Announcements:

  • Champagne Books to publish Traitor Knight by Keith W. Willis
  • Upcoming events promote James Schlett’s A Not Too Greatly Changed Eden: The Story of the Philosophers’ Camp in the Adirondacks
  • Pauline Bartel presents “Gone With the Wind’s Rocky Road to Atlanta” September 18
  • “Your Body’s Autobiography: Movement, Massage & Memoir” September 25-27

Area Announcements:

  • Call for Art: Pine Hollow Arboretum digital photography exhibit
  • Caffè Lena to feature Alan Catlin & Bruce Bennett September 2
  • Arthur’s Market and Cafe 2nd Wednesdays Poetry to feature Esther Willison September 9
  • 2nd Sunday @ 2 Open Mic for Poetry & Prose launches 6th season September 13
  • Writers in the Mountains presents 6-week workshop starting September 14: “Where does a play come from? And where can it go?”
  • Third Thursday features poet Mike Jurkovic September 17
  • Hudson River Coffee House line-up September 24
  • Writers in the Mountains announces “Riting Myth, Writing Myth: Plotting Your Personal Story” September 25-27
  • Arts Center announces new opportunities for artists to showcase their work & gain support
  • Writers Institute Fall 2015 schedule of events
  • Young adults (ages 19-30): Apply for a scholarship from The Chris Miller Fund

GUILD ANNOUNCEMENTS

Community of Writers Reading September 13
The Community of Writers reading series will feature readings by local authors Elizabeth K. Gordon, Julie Lomoe and James Schlett on Sunday, September 13, 2-4 p.m., at the East Greenbush Community Library, 10 Community Way, East Greenbush, NY. They will be reading and discussing their recent work, and their books will be available. The program is free and open to the public and is sponsored by the Hudson Valley Writers Guild.

James Schlett is an award-winning journalist whose feature and business writing has been recognized by the New York Newspaper Publishers Association and the New York State Associated Press Association. He is the author of A Not Too Greatly Changed Eden: The Story of the Philosophers’ Camp in the Adirondacks (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 2015). His prose has been published in Songs of Innocence, New York Archives and the Mid-Atlantic Almanack, and his poetry has been published in Nomad’s Choir, The Literary Gazette, The Heron’s Nest, Acorn and Bottle Rockets.

Elizabeth K. Gordon was born in Queens, NY, and lives now in Cohoes. She is a Pushcart nominated poet and the author of Love Cohoes (CDD Books, 2014), which was a finalist for the Indie Book Awards. Her poems have appeared in PANK, Viral Cat, IthacaLit, Moonshot, Up the River and elsewhere.  She currently teaches writing at Northampton Community College and in community workshops. She discovered slam poetry in 2011 and has since then performed at The Individual World Poetry Slam, the National Poetry Slam and Women of the World Poetry Slam (where she placed 11th in a field of 72). She is a member of Albany’s 2015 Nitty Gritty slam team. For more www.ekg3.com.

Julie Lomoe brings a wealth of mental health and home health care experience to her mystery novels. Her work as an art therapist at a psychiatric hospital inspired her to turn to fiction as a creative outlet. She later founded and ran ElderSource, Inc., a licensed home care services agency in upstate New York. A vocal advocate for the rights of mentally ill and elderly consumers, Julie is a member of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill and of the Mental Health Players, an improvisatory theatre troupe. Her most recent novel is Hope Dawns Eternal, combining intrigue, soap operas & vampires.

MEMBER ANNOUNCEMENTS

Champagne Books to publish Traitor Knight by Keith W. Willis
Champagne Books (Alberta, Canada) will release Keith W. Willis’ debut fantasy novel Traitor Knight on September 8, initially in e-book format. Traitor Knight is a rollicking fantasy combining swashbuckling adventure, intrigue, a large dollop of romance and a dash of wit. Here’s a synopsis:

Morgan McRobbie will do anything to protect the kingdom of Kilbourne. Even betray it. When Morgan rescues a damsel-in-distress from an errant dragon, he expects she’ll swoon, murmuring “My hero!” Instead, Marissa has only loathing for the man everyone believes will betray Kilbourne. That’s fine with Morgan. A woman in his life would just complicate things. A high-level informer threatens the kingdom’s security, and Morgan is out to stop him. Posing as a turncoat himself, he walks a fine line between honor and betrayal. A single misstep could result in disaster, and his mission is fraught with distractions: the pesky dragon, a pair of conniving courtiers, a surfeit of spies and the disillusioned damsel who’s certain Morgan can’t be trusted. If Morgan’s going to save the kingdom, win the girl and manage to stay alive, he’ll need to step up his game. The traitor is lurking in the shadows, and his scheme calls not just for the betrayal of Kilbourne, but also the destruction of Morgan McRobbie.

To obtain a galley version (PDF, epub) for review or to coordinate an interview, contact knightsofkilbourne@gmail.com. To learn more about Champagne Books, go tohttp://champagnebooks.com, and to be notified when Traitor Knight is available for pre-order, sign up here.

Keith W. Willis graduated (a long time ago) from Berry College with a BA in English literature and a desire to tell stories. He lives with his amazingly patient, loving and supportive wife Patty in the upper Hudson Valley region of New York. Keith believes that those rumbling noises long attributed to Henry Hudson’s crew bowling are in actuality dragons grumbling. When Keith isn’t writing down fantastical tales from the land of Kilbourne, he manages a group of database content editors for a global information technology firm. Traitor Knight is his first published novel. Check out Keith’s website Writing@Knight or the Traitor Knight Facebook page. And be sure to follow @kilbourneknight on Twitter.

Upcoming events promote James Schlett’s A Not Too Greatly Changed Eden: The Story of the Philosophers’ Camp in the Adirondacks
The following Capital Region events the are scheduled for James Schlett’s book, A Not Too Greatly Changed Eden: The Story of the Philosophers’ Camp in the Adirondacks (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 2015):

  • September 13 at 2 p.m. — reading/signing at the East Greenbush Public Library, 10 Community Way, East Greenbush, for the Hudson Valley Writers Guild’s Community of Writers
  • September 17 at 7 p.m. — reading/signing at the Altamont Free Library, 179 Main St, Altamont
  • September 27 at 12:30 p.m. — signing at the Open Door Bookstore, 128 Jay St, Schenectady
  • October 4 at 2 p.m. — presentation at the Albany Institute of History and Art, 125 Washington Ave., Albany
  • October 7 at 7 p.m. — reading/signing at Caffe Lena, 47 Phila St. #1, Saratoga Springs.

Pauline Bartel presents “Gone With the Wind’s Rocky Road to Atlanta” September 18
Pauline Bartel, author of The Complete GONE WITH THE WIND Trivia Book, will present the program “Gone With the Wind’s Rocky Road to Atlanta” on Friday, September 18, from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the Clifton Park-Halfmoon Library, 475 Moe Road, Clifton Park, NY. The program is free and open to the public. A book signing will follow the program. “Gone With the Wind” will be shown at 1 p.m.

Many fans consider “Gone With the Wind” one of the most magnificent motion pictures of all time. But what most fans don’t know is that endless months of trouble and behind-the-scenes turmoil almost doomed “Gone With the Wind” to failure. Discover the real story behind the making of “Gone With the Wind,” including why Clark Gable balked at playing Rhett Butler, why the search for an actress to play Scarlett was a hoax, why the film had three directors and how “Gone With the Wind” changed the Academy Awards ceremony forever. Frankly, my dear, this is one program no “Gone With the Wind” fan should miss.

Pauline Bartel is an award-winning writer who has been a devoted “Windie” since the age of 16, when she first saw “Gone With the Wind” with her mother. She is the author of The Complete GONE WITH THE WIND Trivia Book (2nd edition), published to celebrate the film’s 75th anniversary. Bartel is the author of six other popular culture books and a member of the prestigious American Society of Journalists and Author. She resides in Waterford, NY.

“Your Body’s Autobiography: Movement, Massage & Memoir” September 25-27
So often we write about our thoughts, feelings and our connection to the divine, but rarely do we know what the body really wants to express. What story does your body want to tell?
 In this limited-enrollment workshop, we’ll use movement to access memories and stimulate imagination, then shape them into stories or memoir. Using gentle yoga, massage, meditation and music, we’ll write and bring stories to life and bring life to stories. Here are the details:

  • September 25 – 27
  • Pumpkin Hollow Retreat Center, 1184 County route 11, Craryville, NY 12521
  • Fee: $345 includes workshop, vegetarian meals and dorm housing. Private and single rooms are extra.
  • We are asking for a $100 non-refundable deposit. If for some reason WE cancel the workshop, then we’ll refund your deposit. But otherwise, it is non- refundable.
  • To register, please call Elaine at (908) 655-5894 or email her at gratefulspirit33@yahoo.com or Gillian write2gillian@gmail.com

Gillian Kendall is an American-Australian writer who has lived in five countries and eight states. She does all sorts of writing: travel and nonfiction journalism, as well as fiction, essays and memoirs. Visit Gillian’s website at gilliankendall.org.

Elaine Boucher, LMT and Reiki Master, specializes in mind-body-spirit balance, facilitating client’s own awareness and healing. She offers holistic massage, polarity therapy and Reiki to private clients. She teaches workshops in Reiki, chakra and body awareness and also offers ongoing meditation classes. She is a trained facilitator, facilitating classes in a variety of topics for 25 years.

AREA ANNOUNCEMENTS

Call for Art: Pine Hollow Arboretum digital photography exhibit
Images of Nature will be on display during the month of October 2015. Curators for the exhibit are Alan Casline, John Berninger, Kay Abbuhl and Mark W. O’Brien. E-mail up to three images toACASLINE@AOL.COM. If selected you must be able to deliver framed photographs to the Pine Hollow Arboretum Visitors Center on the weekend of September 26-27 or by special arrangement with one of the curators. More details will be shared once your photograph is selected.

The theme for the show is meant to encompass all nature-oriented subjects and is not limited to just photos taken at the arboretum. Framed photos cannot have larger than 11” X 17” image size. Private sales of photos would be allowed but not facilitated by Pine Hollow Arboretum.<

The photography show opening will be Saturday, October 3, at 2 p.m. at the Pine Hollow Visitors Center, 16 Maple Avenue, Slingerlands.

Caffè Lena to feature Alan Catlin & Bruce Bennett September 2
On Wednesday, September 2, Caffè Lena will present poetry readings by Alan Catlin and Bruce Bennett. An open reading will follow. Doors open for sign-ups at 7 p.m., and the readings will start at 7:30. The host for the event will be Carol Graser, and the cost is $5. Caffè Lena, 47 Phila Street, Saratoga Springs, (518) 583-0022, www.caffelena.org

Bruce Bennett is the author of nine volumes of poetry and more than 25 poetry chapbooks. He was a co-founder and editor of Field: Contemporary Poetry and Poetics and Ploughshares, and his reviews of contemporary poetry have appeared in the New York Times Book Review, The Nation, Harvard Review and elsewhere. He was recently selected as the first recipient of the annual Writing the Rockies Lifetime Achievement Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Creative Writing.

Alan Catlin has been publishing for parts of five decades, which makes him feel like the answer to a baseball trivia question. During that time he has amassed thousands of credits which range from the obscure to semi famous, from Wordsworth’s Socks to the Wormwood Review. That, and a 10-trip bus ticket, will get you from where he lives in Schenectady to Saratoga.

Arthur’s Market and Cafe 2nd Wednesdays Poetry to feature Esther Willison September 9
Here are the details for this month’s “Poetry Open-Mic and Featured Poet 2nd Wednesdays:”

  • September 9
  • Sign-up – 7 p.m.; readings – 7:30
  • Arthur’s Market and Cafe, 35 North Ferry St. (at the Lawrence Circle), Schenectady, NY  12305
  • Hosted by Catherine Norr
  • Beverages, food, hospitable atmosphere!
  • As well, a regular gathering to workshop poems occurs at 6 p.m. at Arthur’s before the poetry reading.

Featured poet Esther Willison is a published writer of short stories, essays and poetry, and she won second place in the Pacific Northwest Writers Association Literary Contest for Memoir. Esther leads book discussions at various libraries in the Mohawk Valley System and works at the Open Door Bookstore on Jay Street, Schenectady.

2nd Sunday @ 2 Open Mic for Poetry & Prose launches 6th season September 13
The 2nd Sunday @ 2 Open Mic for Poetry & Prose is announcing its sixth season at the Arts Center on the following dates:

  • September 13
  • October 11
  • November 8
  • December 13
  • January 10
  • February 14 (Valentine’s Day)
  • March 13
  • April 10
  • May 8 (Mother’s Day)
  • June 12

We meet at 2 p.m. in the black box theater or the conference room as needed; please check at the front desk. Please bring 5 minutes of your prose or two poems to read. We will be launching our chapbook of writers’ work called “2” this season, published by A.P.D. press.

This is a volunteer effort, and we receive no funding. We are a community of writers dedicated to writing and to supporting each other. We thank the Arts Center for allowing us to hold our open mic there and are grateful for their support in the form of space.

All are welcome! Students and children under 16 should be accompanied by a parent, as we do not censor writers. Thank you!

Writers in the Mountains presents 6-week workshop starting September 14: “Where does a play come from? And where can it go?” 
Writers in the Mountains (WIM) will present “Where Does A Play Come From? And Where Can It Go?” a 6-week workshop with Amie Brockway at the Open Eye Theater, 960 Main Street in Margaretville, Mondays, 6 to 8 p.m., from September 14 through October 26 (skipping Columbus Day).

In this class, instructor and students will explore first impulses for writing a play and the creative process from page to stage. Participants will look at specific examples found in selected short plays and in excerpts from longer works. They will discover and examine their own creative impulses and see where they lead. There will be time for reading, listening, discussing and writing in each class. Students will be encouraged to begin and complete a short play or monologue over the course of the six sessions or to continue with a longer work already begun. And they’ll look at opportunities for a finished play -locally, regionally and nationally. This class is suitable for beginning and experienced playwrights.

To register call Jean Stone at (607) 326-4802, or e-mail her at jtstone@catskill.net. You may register online at writersinthemountains.org/registeronline. Class fee is $70 if you register and pay by August 24, and $85 after that.

Third Thursday features poet Mike Jurkovic September 17
Poet Mike Jurkovic will read from his work at the Social Justice Center, 33 Central Avenue, Albany, on Thursday,  September 17, at 7:30 p.m. Mike Jurkovic is the co-director of Calling All Poets in Beacon, NY, and producer of CAPSCAST, live recordings from the series. His most recent collection of poems is Eve’s Venom (Post Traumatic Press, 2014), which will be available for sale. Mike had originally been scheduled to read in June but had to be re-scheduled.

A reading by a local or regional poet is held each Third Thursday at the Social Justice Center. The event includes an open mic for audience members to read. Sign-up starts at 7 p.m., with the reading beginning at 7:30. The host of the readings is Albany poet and photographer Dan Wilcox. The suggested donation is $3, which helps support this and other poetry programs of the Poetry Motel Foundation and the work of the Social Justice Center. For more information about this event contact Dan Wilcox, (518) 482-0262; e-mail: dwlcx@earthlink.net.

Hudson River Coffee House line-up September 24
The following people will be reading on September 24 at the Hudson River Coffee House, 227 Quail Street, Albany:

  • Robert Milby
  • Christopher Wheeling
  • Brian Dorn
  • Harvey Havel

The reading starts at 6:30 p.m. and goes until 8:30 p.m.  Open mic follows.

Writers in the Mountains announces “Riting Myth, Writing Myth: Plotting Your Personal Story” September 25-27
Spillian, a creative center housed in a 19th century Victorian mansion built by the Fleischmanns family, will present “Riting Myth, Writing Myth: Plotting Your Personal Story,” Friday through Sunday, September 25 to 27. The event is co-sponsored by Writers in the Mountains and Mythopoetry.com. Over the span of three days, participants will explore the study of mythology with Dennis P. Slattery, PhD, noted author and core professor at Pacifica Graduate Institute.

The weekend begins with a Friday evening lecture “Called to a Co-Hearant Life.” We are all called to a work that may focus on personal and/or professional growth. We might ask: What is the genesis of this call? What are its terms? Is being called a mythic instance in our life that may re-direct our trajectory? What are the consequences of its refusal? “Not now; call me back.” What part are we still to live out?

On Saturday and Sunday participants will engage in several imagination meditations through prose and poetry, drawing and body movement experiences. Through writing prose and poetry, drawing and body movement experiences, participants will engage in several active imagination meditations taken from Dr. Slattery’s book, Riting Myth, Mythic Writing: Plotting Your Personal Story, as well as additional meditations created since the book’s publication, to invite the voice and energy of our personal myth several conduits of expression. Participants will write cursively, so leave all laptops at home. Bring with you a journal, a favorite writing utensil and an open heart to the retreat in order to enjoy this interlude from your daily routines to reflect and write in a welcoming setting and to share, if you wish, some of your own insights and remembrances with others.

Workshop fee is $395. Eligible WIMers will receive a $50 discount. Workshop registration includes meals for the weekend from Spillian’s extraordinary chef Chris McGee, who offers cuisine that pays homage both to the elegantly rustic history of the Catskills and the extraordinary farmers in the region. Rooms are available upon need. To register, call (800) 811-3351. To find out if you’re eligible for a WIM discount, contact Jean Stone at (607) 326-4802 or jstone@catskill.net.

Dennis Patrick Slattery Ph.D., is a core faculty member at Pacifica Graduate Institute who helped shape the development of the mythological studies program. He has been teaching for 40 years from elementary to secondary, undergraduate and graduate programs. He has received the prominent rank of Distinguished Core Faculty at Pacifica Graduate Institute. His areas of emphasis include the poetic imagination, writing and reading as mythic activities; the relation of psyche, spirit and matter; and the place of contemplation within the academic setting. He is the author of several books including: The Idiot: Dostoevsky’s Fantastic Prince; The Wounded Body: Remembering the Markings of Flesh; Grace in the Desert: Awakening to the Gifts of Monastic Life; Harvesting Darkness: Essays on Literature, Myth, Film and Culture and A Limbo of Shards: Essays on Memory, Myth and Metaphor. With Lionel Corbett he has co-edited Depth Psychology: Meditations in the Field, as well as Psychology at the Threshold. With Glen Slater, he has co-edited Varieties of Mythic Experience: Essays on Religion, Psyche and Culture. With Jennifer Selig, he has co-edited Reimagining Education: Essays On Reviving the Soul Of Learning. He is the author of three volumes of poetry: Casting Shadows; Just Below the Water; and Twisted Sky.

Spillian is a place to revel in imagination so that you can remember your genius – and the genius of the world around you. Imagine past what you think is possible… world class workshops, events, weddings, corporate and personal retreats, all are designed to help you launch your dreams. Built as part of a family summer retreat by the Fleischmanns Yeast Family in the 1880s, Spillian is an extraordinary remnant of the Gilded Era, Catskills style. Since its birth, the house has been a place of celebration, of gathering and of sharing ideas, with clear pine paneled walls, extraordinary historic oil murals on many of the walls, fire places that take the chill off from mountain mornings and a porch that was made to watch the light change on the mountains. It is furnished with antiques, including a 1914 Steinway baby grand, oriental rugs and a feasting table that sits twenty under French chandeliers. Upstairs, there are eight bedrooms, each designed with a theme that would have captured the fancy of Victorian travelers. The mansion is tucked on 33 private wooded acres, with trails and meadows and evocative moss-covered ruins. Memory and imagination run deep here.

For more information, visit http://spillian.com/events/riting_myth_writing_myth/.

Arts Center announces new opportunities for artists to showcase their work & gain support
The Arts Center of the Capital Region aims to support local artists and enhance the vibrant and growing local creative community and economy. Several new opportunities for artists to submit and showcase their work, as well as opportunities for local artists to apply for grant funding and a new financial literacy program, are now available.

Sunny da Silva, director of education at The Arts Center, notes, “These programs are essential in supporting local artists – the people who creatively contribute to our communities in so many forms – helping them to make a living through their art. It is our goal to continue to increase services and programs for local artists that foster independence, increase exposure and create opportunities for them to share their work and integrate into the creative community. We invite artists of all types and mediums to take advantage of and participate in these opportunities.”

The opportunities available for artists in all disciplines can be found below. Additional details and submission and application information can be found at our website: www.artscenteronline.org.

  • Nuts, Bolts & BEYOND: An artist-focused entrepreneurial training program / The Arts Center of the Capital Region is collaborating with Art & Context and Liz Friedman Green Room Artist Development LLC to create a professional development program, generously funded by KeyBank, for all local artists in any field including but not limited to visual arts, performing arts, crafts and design. The “Nuts, Bolts & Beyond” program will take place over a 9-month period from October 2015 through May 2016. Throughout the course, artists will learn new ways to advance their economic self-sufficiency through education and access to resources to build and sustain self-employment. “Nuts, Bolts & Beyond” will provide education, professional development and networking opportunities with a focus on learning skills and gaining access to tools that will enhance business acumen. These trainings/seminars will be free of charge, and they will be tailored to the specific 12 artists chosen in their desired mediums. Deadline to apply for the program is September 18.
  • Grant funding opportunities available for artists and arts organizations in Albany, Schenectady and Rensselaer counties / The Arts Center of the Capital Region is pleased to provide valuable resources through the distribution of grants to local artists and arts organizations through a partnership with the New York State Council on the Arts’ (NYSCA) decentralization grants program (DEC) since 1978. The DEC program through The Arts Center delivers grants to individual artists and non-profit organizations to create high quality arts and culture programs that engage the communities within Albany, Rensselaer and Schenectady counties. The grantees utilize funding to grow professionally and to enhance the cultural climate in communities and neighborhoods in our region. This past year we awarded nearly $80,000 in grants in the following categories: Community Arts, Arts in Education and Individual Artist Grants. This year the state has allocated more money for the DEC program in every county of New York State, so it’s a great time to apply. Throughout the grants process you are given the opportunity for guidance and technical assistance, so if you have never applied for a grant before, we will help you navigate through the process. The 2016 grant funding cycle opened on August 15. Visit our website for downloadable grant guidelines and to sign up for an informative seminar. Deadline to register your intent to apply is October 23rd. All new applicants are required to attend a free grant seminar. Final grant application deadline: December 5 at 12 midnight.
  • Playmakers Space at The Arts Center of the Capital Region / The Arts Center is pleased to announce a new program to support the development of new work for the stage. The aim is to encourage, stimulate and support the creation of new work by providing an opportunity for creative expression and exploration in the performing arts medium. In this initial phase of the program, our goal is to help selected playwrights with a strong background in theatre to develop new work through readings and workshops. We will be seeking playmakers that are willing to explore the world of the stage in innovative ways and who are unafraid to take risks. Eventually this program will expand to include actors and directors, designers, musicians and puppeteers; and any art form that is interested in creating and collaborating on work for the stage. Deadline for submissions is September 26.
  • Artist in Residence Program at The Arts Center of the Capital Region / The Arts Center is proud to announce opening of submissions for our 2016 Artist in Residence program. Each residency will run for three months and will offered three times during the calendar year. Residencies will begin on January 6th, 2016, in the private 553 square foot studio at The Arts Center. The Artist In Residence will have full use of the dynamic and diverse facilities, studios and talented instructors at the Arts Center. One lucky artist will also have full access to the maker space at The Tech Valley Center of Gravity in addition to The Art Centers resources, made possible by a generous partnership with The Center of Gravity. The main goal of the AIR program is to focus support for local creative talent within the Capital Region, allowing artists of all mediums to explore, create and grow within their practice. We want our artists to go beyond their usual surroundings and immerse themselves in The Arts Center and the local creative community, and this program will allow a unique cross-medium platform for the artist. Deadline for applications is October 26.
  • Submissions for BraVa! A unique event benefiting women / Planning is underway for a first-of-its-kind event to benefit female residents of the YWCA of the Greater Capital Region, Inc., based in Troy. The Arts Center will be hosting “Brava!” a fundraiser seeking to provide new bras (an item often in desperately short supply at the YWCA-GCR) to women at the YWCA-GCR. The event will feature 12 talented writers from around the region who will read jury-selected poems and essays or perform songs and monologues on the subject of bras in their lives. The pieces will touch on the subject from many viewpoints and range from poignant to hilarious.  Deadline for applications is October 1.

Writers Institute Fall 2015 schedule of events
The Writers Institute Fall 2015 schedule of events offers a rich variety of genres, from poetry to science writing to fiction to history to memoir to filmmaking and theatre. The upcoming series will even include a food writer — New York Times columnist and bestselling cookbook author Mark Bittman, whose work has been described by PBS as a “bible of basic cooking for millions of Americans.”

The series will showcase two extraordinary former students at UAlbany — journalist Tom Junod, who holds the all-time record for National Magazine Award nominations (11!), and Edward Burns, director, actor, and one of the most prolific and influential independent filmmakers currently at work. Burns will present his new memoir, Independent Ed (2015), about which Matt Lauer of “Today” said, “Every young, hungry, creative person should view this as a textbook…. It’s a how-to.”

Other guests will include Oscar-nominated documentary filmmaker Rachel Grady; young adult novelist Jason Reynolds, winner of the American Library Association’s Coretta Scott King Award; major American short story writer Ann Beattie; Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Adam Johnson; bestselling horror novelist Peter Straub; National Book Award finalist Mary Gaitskill; “Best New Documentary Filmmaker” at the Tribeca Film Festival, Sean Dunne; trail-blazing neuroscience writer Casey Schwartz; Vonnegut biographer Ginger Strand; and major American dramatist Tina Howe.

For more on the Visiting Writers Series, visit:  http://www.albany.edu/writers-inst/webpages4/programpages/vws.html#.VdXvw1_D_s1

For more on the Classic Film Series, visit:  http://www.albany.edu/writers-inst/webpages4/programpages/cfs.html#.VdXwQF_D_s0

For more information, visit us online at http://www.albany.edu/writers-inst or call us at (518) 442-5620.

Young adults (ages 19-30): Apply for a scholarship from The Chris Miller Fund
When Arts Center faculty member Donna Miller’s son died in a car crash three years ago, Donna and her husband Harry felt a need to do something in Christopher’s memory – something that would both reflect his spirit and benefit others. They turned to The Arts Center – a natural fit – and created The Chris Miller Creative Arts Scholarship Fund.

“Chris was a very creative person who communicated most eloquently through the arts. He was also very proud of the fact that I am a writer,” says Donna. “The arts are an important part of this family.” It seems an appropriate and moving tribute that the Millers created a vehicle to allow other young adults an opportunity to experience the joy of creative expression, regardless of experience or economic status.

The Chris Miller Creative Arts Scholarship Fund was created to help young low-income adults, ages 19-30, engage in or explore the creative arts at The Arts Center of the Capital Region. The Fund provides tuition support for creative and expressive arts classes in writing, drawing, painting, pottery, printmaking and digital arts. In keeping with The Arts Center’s policy, all scholarships are awarded on the basis of financial need. Scholarship prospects must complete a scholarship application, and all scholars are encouraged to pay a portion of the costs, if they are able. Applications (available here) take at least two weeks to process, so please be prompt with your request.

Hudson Valley Writers Guild newsletter, August 2015

IN THIS ISSUE

Guild Announcements:

  • REMINDER: Hudson Valley Writers Guild Poetry Contest deadline is August 15
  • HVWG 2015 mid-year membership report

Member Announcements:

  • Down & Out Books to publish Welcome Back, Jack by Liam Sweeny
  • News from M.E. Kemp
  • NPR’s “All Things Considered” features James Schlett’s newly released book
  • New issue of Misfit Magazine now live online

Area Announcements:

  • 29th Annual Altamont Fair Poetry Reading: August 12
  • Arthur’s Market & Cafe 2nd Wednesday Poetry to feature Bunkong “BK” Tuon August 12
  • Next Year’s Words announces its first 2015-2016 event: Art & writing walk/reading August 16
  • Third Thursday to feature poet Michael Platsky August 20
  • Local Writer Debby Mayer to read new fiction at Roe Jan Library August 23
  • “Inquiring Minds” reading & discussion August 23
  • Hudson River Coffee Company reading & open mic September 24
  • Casting call: “Veterans’ Voices: Ajax in America”
  • Register for Tinker Mountain Writers’ online workshops
  • Harvey Havel publishes The Thruway Killers
  • Submission opportunity: Aesthetica Creative Writing Award
  • Publisher looking for Hudson Valley writers

GUILD ANNOUNCEMENTS

REMINDER: Hudson Valley Writers Guild Poetry Contest deadline is August 15
One to three previously unpublished poems may be submitted. Poems must not exceed 40 lines. Contact information must not appear anywhere on the submission. A cover letter must include: name, address, phone number, email, title, and line count. Submissions must be typed using 12-point Times New Roman or Cambria font.  Send three hard copies by mail. No email submissions. Please no pornography or erotica. This year’s judges are Howard Kogan and Cheryl A.Rice. Additional details:

  • Cash prizes will be awarded to first ($100), second ($75), and third place ($50) poems.
  • The winning poets will be invited to read their winning submissions at a program in the fall.
  • All contestants must be residents of New York State.
  • The entry fee is $10 for HVWG members and $15 for non-members. Checks made payable to HVWG must accompany submissions. If $30 membership fee is paid with submission, please enclose a separate check.
  • HVWG Board of Directors and their families and/or current or past students and family of judges are ineligible.
  • Entries must be postmarked between June 15-August 15, 2015.

All entrants will be notified of winners by email unless a SASE is provided. Results will be posted on our website: http://hvwg.org. Contact Jan Tramontano at jantramontano@gmail.com for more information. Mail submissions and entry fee to: HVWG CONTEST c/o Jan Tramontano, 14 Brookwood Avenue, Albany, NY  12203

HVWG 2015 mid-year membership report
By the end of June 2015, the Hudson Valley Writers Guild had 126 “active” members, people who paid membership dues in 2014 and so far in 2015. Of them, 49 (39 %) paid their 2015 dues by mid-year. These 49 dues payers contributed $1,585 to the Guild’s coffers. There were 13 new members and 36 renewing members during this period. Three people paid two-year memberships. So far this year, 101 membership letters have been mailed out (13 new member welcome, 36 renewal thank you and 52 membership dues reminder).

The Guild is especially pleased to welcome the following new members so far in 2015:

  • Lena Andersson
  • Mark L. Berger
  • Alan Casline
  • Charles Curry
  • Sandra Hutchison
  • David Kalish
  • Cynthia A. Kilgallon
  • Susan Kress
  • James Schlett
  • Lisa St. John
  • Jim Strickland
  • Martha Sutro
  • David Walsh

The Guild had an honor roll by mid-year of three members who made extra financial contributions in addition to their membership dues. They were:

  • Phyllis Hillinger
  • Kathleen O’Brien
  • David Wolcott

The Guild’s Board is most grateful for the confidence expressed by new and renewing members for the Hudson Valley Writers Guild and the work we do for writers in New York’s Hudson Valley.

MEMBER ANNOUNCEMENTS

Down & Out Books to publish Welcome Back, Jack by Liam Sweeny
Down & Out Books will release Liam Sweeny’s debut police thriller Welcome Back, Jack in October 2015 in trade paperback and ebook formats. Set in and around Albany, New York, the story is centered on Detective Jack LeClere, a good cop on a cat-and-mouse hunt for a team of serial killers — only he’s not sure whether he’s the cat or the mouse.

“I wanted to avoid the common ‘flawed cop’ theme that runs through a lot of detective novels,” Sweeny said. “Instead, I wanted to tear the envelope on a good cop, and see what it did to him. The story line follows Jack and a multi-agency task force and finds tension on two levels: his role on the task force and the task itself.”

Down & Out Books publisher Eric Campbell added, “Liam does a wonderful job of writing a multi-layered seat-of-the-pants thriller that is incredibly satisfying.”

Liam Sweeny has a background in disaster response, working major events such as hurricanes Katrina, Irene and Sandy. He incorporated much of the pressure he found in those operations to flesh out Jack’s struggles inside the task-force. His short fiction has appeared in numerous periodicals, including Thuglit, All Due Respect, Spinetingler Magazine, Shotgun Honey and Out of the Gutter Online. Down & Out Books, an indie-publisher based in Tampa, FL, has been serving up the best crime fiction since 2011.

To obtain a galley version (PDF, mobi, epub) for review, or to coordinate an interview, contact Christy@DownAndOutBooks.com. Visit Liam Sweeny online at http://liamsweeny.com/. Find out more about Down & Out Books at http://downandoutbooks.com/.

News from M.E. Kemp
M. E. Kemp, VP of HVWG, taught a course in five parts of mystery writing at the Women’s Writing Retreat in Paradox Lake. Kemp wishes to remind writers and members that the annual HVWG Writers Conference will be held on October 18, place to be announced.

NPR’s “All Things Considered” features James Schlett’s newly released book
James Schlett’s newly released book, A Not Too Greatly Changed Eden: The Story of the Philosophers’ Camp in the Adirondacks (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 2015), scored a national news hit on July 24 with a story on NPR’s “All Things Considered.” North Country Public Radio will soon air an extended version of the “All Things Considered” story. Below is a roundup of articles, reviews and news stories the book has earned since the spring:

Remember to follow news about A Not Too Greatly Changed Eden on Facebook (www.Facebook.com/ANotTooGreatlyChangedEden) and Twitter (@JamesSchlett).

New issue of Misfit Magazine now live online
The latest issue of Misfit Magazine, the 15th, is now live at the site misfitmagazine.net. This is by far the biggest and most challenging issue yet with the usual poems, a mini-feature with photos, a small poems feature and scads of reviews, great art and an essay by the editor. Misfit Magazine is looking for submissions from now until the Fall for one more issue this year, as the editors plan to take the winter holiday months off to be with their families.

AREA ANNOUNCEMENTS

29th Annual Altamont Fair Poetry Reading: August 12
Local poets will read from their own work and the works of the past. Live from the Hotel Altamont Stage in the Village and Carriage Museum starting at 2 p.m. and continuing throughout the afternoon.

Arthur’s Market & Cafe 2nd Wednesday Poetry to feature Bunkong “BK” Tuon August 12
Poetry open mic and featured poet on the 2nd Wednesday’s at Arthur’s Market and Cafe, 35 North Ferry St. (at the Lawrence Circle), Schenectady 12305. Featured poet August 12 is Bunkong “BK” Tuon. BK teaches writing and literature at Union College in Schenectady. Recent publication include Nerve Cowboy, Mas Tequila Review, Chiron Review and others. He is celebrating the new release of his full length poetry collection entitled Gruel. Fall semester he will be teaching students abroad in Vietnam. Come for some heart-opening stories and sharing!

Hosted by Catherine Norr. Sign-up begins 7 p.m.; readings begin at 7:30. Food and beverages available in a warm, hospitable atmosphere!

Next Year’s Words announces its first 2015-2016 event: Art & writing walk/reading August 16
On August 16, spend an artistic afternoon writing and reading poems about art along the Rail Trail in Rosendale alongside Next Year’s Words poets Tim Brennan, Holly Christiana, Susan Chute, Kim Ellis, Bobbi Katz, Richard Parisio and Pina Russell. Meet at 11 a.m. at the Binnewater Kiln parking lot on Binnewater Road. Public reading of fresh work at 2 p.m. at Women’s Studio Workshop. Additional details available via its Facebook event.

Third Thursday to feature poet Michael Platsky August 20
Poet Michael Platsky will read from his work at the Social Justice Center, 33 Central Avenue, Albany on Thursday, August 20 at 7:30 p.m. Michael Platsky was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, came of age in lower Manhattan and moved to Woodstock in the 1995. He hosts a weekly poetry reading at the Harmony Cafe in Woodstock. Most of his writing reflects personal experience in a sometimes chaotic world.

A reading by a local or regional poet is held each Third Thursday at the Social Justice Center. The event includes an open mic for audience members to read. Sign-up starts at 7 p.m., with the reading beginning at 7:30. The host of the readings is Albany poet and photographer Dan Wilcox. The suggested donation is $3, which helps support this and other poetry programs of the Poetry Motel Foundation and the work of the Social Justice Center. For more information about this event contact Dan Wilcox: (518) 482-0262; e-mail: dwlcx@earthlink.net.<

Local Writer Debby Mayer to read new fiction at Roe Jan Library August 23
Debby Mayer, an award-winning author, blogger and journalist, reads her short story “Swerve” at the Roeliff Jansen Community Library on Sunday, August 23, at 4 p.m. The program, entitled “Not about Me,” features new fiction and represents a departure from the memoir, nonfiction and blog posts with which Mayer’s readers are more familiar. In a Q&A Mayer will discuss how she approaches the writing of fiction vs. nonfiction and what makes the difference between the two.

Debby Mayer is a resident of Hudson and author of a memoir, Riptides & Solaces Unforeseen. Writing about Riptides in Wilderness House Literary Review, George Held said, “Debby Mayer has written personal nonfiction that reads like a novel; she leaves readers with that elusive sense of catharsis only art can provide.”

Debby Mayer writes the blog “2becomes1: widowhood for the rest of us” at debbymayer.blogspot.com. She retired as editorial director of the publications office at Bard College and is now a contributing editor forThe Columbia Paper, the weekly newspaper of Columbia County. She is the recipient of two grants from the New York Foundation for the Arts: one in creative nonfiction for an excerpt from Riptides; the other in fiction for an excerpt from Sisters, a novel.

This event is funded in part by Poets & Writers with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

The Roeliff Jansen Community Library, which is chartered to serve Ancram, Copake and Hillsdale, is located at 9091 Rt. 22, approximately one mile south of the light at the intersection of Routes 22 and 23 in Hillsdale. For information on hours and events, call (518) 325-4101 or visit the library’s website at www.roejanlibrary.org.

Inquiring Minds reading & discussion August 23
An invitation from Celine Keating: “Dear Hudson Valley Writers, Two other authors and I will be in New Paltz for a reading and discussion at Inquiring Minds on Sunday, August 2, at 4 p.m. The focus of the discussion part is the current publishing landscape and the options to writers of the various paths to publication. Among the three of us we have experience and published work with traditional publishing, small press and hybrid publishers. We realize the region you serve is a bit north of New Paltz, but in any case would love it if you would share this information with your membership, who might be interested in attending and sharing in the discussion. Thanks so much, and hope to see you there!

Hudson River Coffee Company reading & open mic September 24
Harvey Havel writes, “Robert Milby, Brian Dorn, Christopher Wheeling and Harvey Havel will be reading at the Hudson River Coffee Company on September 24, 2015.  An open mic will follow.”

Casting call: “Veterans’ Voices: Ajax in America”
Staged Reading of Sophocles’ “Ajax.” We are looking for one female and six male actors who are also veterans and interested in auditioning for a concert reading of Sophocles “Ajax” to be produced in October at Skidmore College and possibly other venues in the Albany/Saratoga area. Auditions will take place ASAP, and there will be rehearsals as needed. This is an all-veterans production by volunteers. The play portrays Ajax’s dislocation, paranoia, rage and self-destruction after the Trojan War.

Cast of characters:

  • Ajax: son of Telamon and a Greek commander from Salamis
  • Techmesa: Phrygian captive, wife of Ajax
  • Chorus: Salaminian warriors
  • Teucer: half brother of Ajax, son of Telamon and Hesione, a Trojan
  • Non speaking role
  • Eurysaces: young son of Ajax and Techmesa

Anyone interested please contact Paul Pines at paul.pines@gmail.com.

Register for Tinker Mountain Writers’ online workshops
Tinker Mountain Writers’ Workshop/Online presents eight-week noncredit workshops September 20-November 13 that emphasize new work. The program features lively conversation and immediate feedback from both faculty and participants. Writers who are just getting started or continuing work on a long-term project can benefit. It’s a unique opportunity to engage with writing and a new writing community from the comfort of home. Click here to register.

Harvey Havel publishes The Thruway Killers
Harvey Havel has just come out with a new book, The Thruway Killers. This work follows The Orphan of Mecca, Part One, which came out earlier this spring. In The Thruway Killers, Droogan McPhee is the son of a wealthy entrepreneur who owns several liquor stores throughout Connecticut and Massachusetts. His step-mother is roughly Droogan’s same age. Together they plot to kill his wealthy father for the inheritance money, until Droogan shoots his step-mother instead by mistake. What follows is an odyssey along the New York Thruway, as the police will stop everything to make sure that the fleeing Droogan is captured and brought to justice.

Harvey Havel is a freelance writer and novelist. He is formerly a writing instructor at Bergen Community College in Paramus, New Jersey. He also taught writing at the University of Albany (SUNY) and at the College of St. Rose. He has a cat named Marty.

Submission opportunity: Aesthetica Creative Writing Award
The Aesthetica Creative Writing Award is open for submissions. Now in its eighth year, the award is an internationally renowned prize presented by Aesthetica Magazine and judged by industry experts including Arifa Akbar, literary editor of The Independent. Prizes include £500 and publication in an anthology of new writing, giving you the chance to showcase your work to a wider, international audience.

Prizes include:

  • £500 Poetry winner
  • £500 Short Fiction winner
  • Publication in the Aesthetica Creative Writing Annual
  • One year subscription to Granta
  • Selection of books courtesy of Bloodaxe and Vintage
  • Complimentary copy of the Aesthetica Creative Writing Annual

There are two categories for entry: short fiction (maximum length 2,000 words each) and poetry (maximum length 40 lines each). Deadline for submissions is August 31. To enter, visitwww.aestheticamagazine.com/creativewriting.

Publisher looking for Hudson Valley writers
Opportunity passed along via HVWG member Therese L. Broderick:

Stevie Edwards, Commissioning Editor
The History Press
http://www.historypress.net

“We are a trade paperback publisher that focuses on publishing accessible local and regional histories, ranging from The History of Michigan Wines by Sharon Kegerreis and Lorri Hathaway to The Civil War in Fairfax County by Charles V. Mauro to Strange Maine: True Tales from the Pine Tree State by Michelle Y. Souliere. I deal specifically with developing titles in New York (state) and New Jersey, and I would love to work with more writers from the Hudson Valley who want to tell the stories of the region. I invite you to browse our online catalog and author proposal form to get a sense for our range and process. We handle all stages of the publishing process – from editing, design and production to sales and distribution — and compensate in the form of royalties.”

Hudson Valley Writers Guild newsletter, July 2015

Hudson Valley Writers Guild Newsletter

IN THIS ISSUE

Guild Announcements:

  • HVWG poetry contest open for entries through 8/15

Member Announcements:

  • French version of Hollis Seamon novel wins literary award, releases new edition
  • Latest chapbook from Alan Catlin is Beautiful Mutants
  • James Schlett launches Northeast book tour

Area Announcements:

  • Rolling admission for NYS Summer Writers Institute workshops (space permitting)
  • Upcoming readings for NYS Summer Writers Institute
  • “Poets in the Park” 2015 readings scheduled July 11, 18, & 25
  • Poet Melody Davis will read at the Social Justice Center July 16
  • Martin Steingesser’s “The Thinking Heart – History in Poetry and Music” at Roe Jan Library July 18
  • Sixth Annual Unicorn Writers Conference August 15

GUILD ANNOUNCEMENTS

HVWG poetry contest open for entries through 8/15
The Hudson Valley Writers Guild is pleased to announce this year’s poetry contest. Cash prizes will be awarded to first ($100), second ($75) and third place ($50) poems. The winning poets will be invited to read their winning submissions at a program in the fall.

All contestants must be residents of New York State. The entry fee is $10 for HVWG members and $15 for non-members. Forms for guild membership may be found at hvwg.org. One to three poems may be submitted. Each poem must be no longer than 40 lines. A cover letter must include: name, address, phone number, email, title(s). Each poem must appear on a separate page. Entries must be postmarked between June 15-August 15, 2015.

Judges are Cheryl Rice and Howard Kogan. Cheryl A. Rice’s work has appeared in Baltimore Review, Chronogram, Florida Review, Home Planet News, Mangrove, The Temple and Woodstock Times, and in the anthologies Wildflowers, Vol. II (2002: Shivastan Publishing), For Enid With Love (2010: NY Quarterly Books) and A Slant of Light  (2013:Codhill Press), among others. She is the author of Moses Parts the Tulips (2013: APD Press), My Minnesota Boyhood (2012: Post Traumatic Press) and Auction (2004, Flying Monkey Press; 2nd edition 2010). Her CDs are: “Nobody Slept Last Night” (2003, Another Poor Bastard Productions) and “Girl Poet” (2007, Flying Monkey Productions). Howard Kogan is an award winning poet whose work has appeared in many literary journals including Still Crazy, Occupoetry, Poetry Ark, Naugatuck River Review, Jewish Currents Anthology (2014), Jewish Currents Calendar (2015), Writer’s Haven, Farming Magazine, Literary Gazette, Pathways, Up the River, Point Mass Anthology and Misfit Magazine. He has also published a book of poems, Indian Summer, and a chapbook, General Store Poems.<

For more information regarding submissions, go to www.hvwg.org or contact Jan Tramontano at jantramontano@gmail.com

MEMBER ANNOUNCEMENTS

French version of Hollis Seamon novel wins literary award, releases new edition
Hollis Seamon’s novel Dieu Me Deteste, the French version of Somebody Up There Hates You, has won a national French literary award, the 2015 CBPT Prix Litteraire 18-30 from the Union Nationale Culture et Bibliotheques Pour Tous (The National Union of Culture and Libraries for All). The prize is awarded annually for the best book for readers 18-30 years old published in the previous year, as chosen by libraries across France. The prize was announced on May 6, 2015, by the General Assembly of CBPT in Paris. Here’s a link to an announcement: http://www.cbpt-paris.org/index.php/prix-cbpt and a PDF: http://www.cbpt71.com/prix18302015.pdf. There is also a new edition of Dieu Me Deteste, issued in May by Editions 10/18 in Paris:  http://www.10-18.fr/livres-poche/.

Latest chapbook from Alan Catlin is Beautiful Mutants
Alan Catlin has published a new chapbook of poetry called Beautiful Mutants, which is available now from Night Ballet Press or from the author. Anyone interested in owning their very own copy can contact Alan at thecatlins@msn.com or the editor of Night Ballet Press at the website.<

James Schlett launches Northeast book tour
In August, Rotterdam author James Schlett will launch his Northeast book tour for A Not Too Greatly Changed Eden: The Story of the Philosophers’ Camp in the Adirondacks (Ithaca and London, Cornell University Press, 2015) with the following two events in the Capital Region:

  • 8/1/2015, Saturday, 7 p.m., Northshire Bookstore, 424 Broadway, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
  • 8/7/2015, Friday, 6 p.m., Albany Institute of History and Art (free admission), 125 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12210

Other readings and presentations are scheduled for the following venues this summer and fall: Massachusetts Historical Society, Concord Free Public Library, Olana State Historic Site, SUNY Adirondack Writer’s Project and Caffe Lena. For the latest reviews, tour updates and other news on A Not Too Greatly Changed Eden, like the book’s Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/ANotTooGreatlyChangedEden.

AREA ANNOUNCEMENTS

Rolling admission for NYS Summer Writers Institute workshops (space permitting)
The New York State Summer Writers Institute has begun its 28th season at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs. To apply:  https://www.skidmore.edu/summerwriters/workshops.php. Students may enroll for two weeks (June 29 – July 10 or July 13-24) or for the entire four-week session (June 29-July 24).

Since its inaugural season in 1987, the New York State Summer Writers Institute has drawn students from across the United States as well as from Australia, Brazil, France, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, New Zealand, Pakistan, the Philippines, Poland, South Korea and Singapore. Students have ranged from 20 to 99 years of age. The Institute is intended principally for students who have had at least one or two previous workshop experiences. It is definitely not for high school students or for freshman college students. The Institute offers courses for undergraduate and graduate credit, as well as noncredit courses. Approximately 50 percent of the program participants are undergraduate or graduate students.

For questions and concerns, please call Christine R. Merrill, Program Coordinator, Office of the Dean of Special Programs, at (518) 580-5593.

Upcoming readings for NYS Summer Writers Institute
All readings are at 8 p.m. in Davis Auditorium, Palamountain Hall, Skidmore College, 815 N. Broadway, Saratoga Springs.

  • JULY 1: Fiction reading by Michael Ondaajte and poetry reading by Campbell McGrath
  • JULY 2: Poetry reading by Charles Simic and fiction reading by Howard Norman
  • JULY 3: Fiction reading by Claire Messud and fiction reading by Elizabeth Benedict
  • JULY 6: Poetry reading by Carolyn Forche and fiction reading by Victoria Redel
  • JULY 7: Poetry reading by Frank Bidart and fiction reading by Rivka Galchen
  • JULY 8: Fiction reading by Mary Gaitskill and non-fiction reading by Honor Moore
  • JULY 9: Fiction reading by Joseph O’Neill and fiction reading by Joanna Scott
  • JULY 10: Fiction reading by Joyce Carol Oates
  • JULY 13: Fiction reading by Amy Hempel and fiction reading by William Kennedy
  • JULY 14: Fiction reading by Ann Beattie and poetry reading by Tom Healy
  • JULY 15: Fiction reading by Rick Moody and poetry reading by Lloyd Schwartz
  • JULY 16: Non-fiction reading by Nick Flynn and fiction reading by Adam Braver
  • JULY 17: Poetry reading by Robert Pinsky poetry reading by Peg Boyers
  • JULY 20: Fiction reading by Cristina Garcia and poetry reading by Wayne Koestenbaum
  • JULY 21:Fiction reading by Russell Banks and poetry reading by Chase Twichell
  • JULY 22: Non-fiction reading by Laura Kipnis and non-fiction reading by Jim Miller
  • JULY 23: Fiction reading by Jamaica Kincaid and poetry reading by Henri Cole
  • JULY 24: Fiction reading by Paul Harding and fiction reading by Binnie Kirshenbaum

For more information, please call Christine R. Merrill, Program Coordinator, Office of the Dean of Special Programs, at (518) 580-5593.

“Poets in the Park” 2015 readings scheduled July 11, 18, & 25
Poets in the Park is celebrating over 20 years of bringing poetry in July to the Robert Burns statue in Washington Park, Albany. The series was started in 1989 by the late Tom Nattell and is now run by Albany poet and photographer Dan Wilcox. This year the readings will be on Saturdays July 11, 18 and 25; the readings start at 7:00 p.m. and are free and open to the public. Donations are accepted. Rain site is the Social Justice Center, 33 Central Avenue, Albany. The series is co-sponsored by the Poetry Motel Foundation and by the Hudson Valley Writers Guild.

The 2015 readers are:

  • July 11, The Nitty Gritty Slam Team, with guest host Thom Francis
  • July 18, Paul Pines & Karen Schoemer
  • July 25, Alison Koffler & Dayl Wise

The Robert Burns statue is located near where Henry Johnson Boulevard passes through Washington Park and crosses Hudson Ave. Please bring your own chairs or blankets to sit on. For more information, contact Dan Wilcox at dwlcx@earthlink.net or (518) 482-0262.

Poet Melody Davis will read at the Social Justice Center July 16
Local poet Melody Davis will read from her work at the Social Justice Center, 33 Central Avenue, Albany, on Thursday, July 16, 2015 at 7:30 p.m.

Melody Davis, poet and art historian, is the author of four books, most recently Holding the Curve from Broadstone Books. Her critical study, Women’s Views: The Narrative Stereograph in Nineteenth-Century America, will be forthcoming this fall from the University Press of New Hampshire. Davis teaches at the Sage College of Albany and is widely published in the US and abroad.

A reading by a local or regional poet is held each Third Thursday at the Social Justice Center. The event includes an open mic for audience members to read. Sign-up starts at 7 p.m., with the reading beginning at 7:30. The host of the readings is Albany poet and photographer Dan Wilcox. The suggested donation is $3, which helps support this and other poetry programs of the Poetry Motel Foundation and the work of the Social Justice Center. For more information about this event contact Dan Wilcox at (518) 482-0262 or dwlcx@earthlink.net.

Martin Steingesser’s “The Thinking Heart – History in Poetry and Music” at Roe Jan Library July 18
“The Thinking Heart: The Life & Loves of Etty Hillesum,” poet Martin Steingesser’s original arrangement of the diaries and letters of Etty Hillesum, will be performed at the Roeliff Jansen Community Library on Saturday, July 18, at 5 p.m. Etty Hillesum, a Jewish woman who lived in Amsterdam during the Nazi occupation, wrote a diary and over 70 letters between 1941 and ‘43, ending with her transport to Auschwitz-Birkenau, where she died at age 29. Steingesser and Judy Tierney will perform “The Thinking Heart” with cellist Robin Jellis.

Martin Steingesser, Portland, Maine’s first Poet Laureate (2007-09), has published two books of poems, Brothers of Morning and The Thinking Heart: The Life & Loves of Etty Hillesum, and has a third book,Yellow Horses, scheduled for publication in fall, 2015. Judy Tierney has been presenting poems in Maine for a number of years. She was creator and host of a weekly radio program, “Walking in the Air,” celebrating poetry and its voices, on WRFR, Rockland, Maine’s community radio station. Robin Jellis, cellist, has played with the Bangor Symphony, and is a faculty member at the Portland Conservatory of Music. Her music for “The Thinking Heart” is comprised mostly of improvisational meditations inspired by the poems and includes quotes from Ernest Bloch. Influences include folk songs and J.S. Bach’s Suites for Unaccompanied Cello. The final movement is an original piece by Jellis.<

The Roeliff Jansen Community Library, which is chartered to serve Ancram, Copake and Hillsdale, is located at 9091 Rt. 22, approximately one mile south of the light at the intersection of Routes 22 and 23 in Hillsdale. For information on hours and events, call (518) 325-4101 or visit the library’s website at www.roejanlibrary.org.

Sixth Annual Unicorn Writers Conference August 15

DATE: Saturday, August 15
PLACE: Reid Castle at Manhattanville College, Purchase, NY
TIME: 7:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. (one-day conference)
REGISTRATION:  $300 (Special group discount: 10% off the $300 registration fee. Discount code HVWGUILD15)

INCLUDES:

  • Keynote Speaker:  Stephanie Evanovich;
  • 30 workshops offered throughout the day. Choose the topics that are best for you;
  • Agent and editor panels;
  • Opportunity to reserve 30-minute, face-to-face 1-1 reviews on your first 40 manuscript pages, query letter, book synopses or jacket flap copy with agents, editors or other conference faculty–all publishing insiders;
  • Breakfast, lunch and dinner;
  • Conference gift bag.

Unicorn Writers Conference is recognized as a top choice for writers at every stage of their writing journey seeking traditional or alternate publishing opportunities. Workshops and speakers cover creativity, craft, and career. Register now!  Visit www.unicornwritersconfeence.com  and select “registration” link.

Hudson Valley Writers Guild newsletter, June 2015

Hudson Valley Writers Guild Newsletter

Important note: Do not submit news items for future newsletters by replying to this email. INSTEAD, please send news items to hvwgnews@gmail.com. Thank you!

IN THIS ISSUE

Member Announcements:

  • Misfit Editor Alan Catlin reports on upcoming misfit magazine
  • Leslie Neustadt to facilitate writing & collage class starting June 17
  • Around and Into the Unknown by Hillary Savoie available now at Amazon
  • Publishing news from member Charles Curry

Area Announcements:

  • Caffè Lena to present a poetry reading by Jordan Smith June 3
  • Arthur’s Market & Cafe Second Wednesday Open-Mic to feature Susan Kress June 10
  • 6th Annual Community of Jewish Writers Poetry Reading, Book Sale and Reception June 14
  • Third Thursday to feature Mike Jurkovic June 18
  • Celebration of Women’s Voices Conference – Women Writers Past and Present
  • “2,” Call for submissions: Poets and prose writers of 2nd Sunday @ 2
  • Springfield (Missouri) Writers Guild invites HVWG members & others to submit to writing contest
  • Berkshire Festival of Women Writers Summer Leadership Institute for Teen Girls & Young Women
  • Registration open for two workshops with Pat Schneider (assisted by Kate Hymes)
  • Cornell University Press to publish book by James Schlett of Rotterdam

MEMBER ANNOUNCEMENTS

Misfit Editor Alan Catlin reports on upcoming misfit magazine
Coming soon, on or about, June 1, an interim issue of misfit magazine, #14, “The Traveling Wilbury’s: Misfit Editors Edition.” This stand-alone half issue, between our regular issues, will feature work by each of the three editors on their recent travels abroad: Jennifer in Spain, Gene in Paris and yours truly, Alan Catlin, in England. Expect some great art, killer photos, poems and a travelogue (of sorts) covering all the overseas bases.

Leslie Neustadt to facilitate writing & collage class starting June 17
The Independent Living Center of the Hudson Valley (ILCHV) presents “Claiming Our Power; Sharing Our Stories: A Writing and Collage Class for People with Disabilities.” Join Leslie Neustadt, artist and poet, to

  • participate in a 6-week class to learn to write poems and essays about your personal experiences with disability;
  • produce collages and poems and/or essays you have written to include in a chapbook; and
  • read your work at a reading and reception in celebration of National Disability Awareness Month (October 2015).

There is no cost to participate. Classes will take place at ILCHV, 15 Third Street, Troy, from 5-6:30 p.m. starting June 17. For more information or to register, call Barbara at 518/274-0701. This project is made possible in part through a Community Arts Grant, a program funded by The Arts Center of the Capital Region through the New York State Council on the Arts.<

Around and Into the Unknown by Hillary Savoie available now at Amazon
In the beautiful Around And Into The Unknown, American writer and disability rights activist Hillary Savoie and her daughter, Esmé, journey from the first ultrasound through ICU through diagnosis after diagnosis to acceptance during Esmé’s first four tumultuous years of life. The story is available both as an e-book and as part of a paperback anthology.

Publishing news from member Charles Curry
Garbanzo Literary Journal has recently published “Ragged Glories” by Charles Curry in Volume 5 (page 37). For more information about this magazine or to purchase this issue, visit its website.

AREA ANNOUNCEMENTS

Caffè Lena to present a poetry reading by Jordan Smith June 3
On Wednesday, June 3, Caffè Lena will present a poetry reading by Jordan Smith. An open reading will follow. Doors open for sign-ups at 7 p.m., and the readings will start at 7:30. The host for the event will be Carol Graser, and the cost is $5. Caffè Lena, 47 Phila St., Saratoga Springs, 518/583-0022, www.caffelena.org.

Arthur’s Market & Cafe Second Wednesday Open-Mic to feature Susan Kress June 10
Arthur’s Market & Cafe, 35 North Ferry Street, Schenectady, NY. Wednesday, June 10. Susan Kress has ​published numerous essays and articles and a book, Carolyn G. Heilbrun: Feminist in a Tenured Position (University Press of Virginia), reissued in paperback​ with a new epilogue​ on Heilbrun’s suicide.​ ​After 38 years​ as Vice President for Academic Affairs and Professor of English at Skidmore College​, Kress is now focusing on poetry.​

Sign-up begins at 7 p.m. Readings begin at 7:30 p.m. Hosted by Catherine Norr.  Food and beverages available along with a warm, welcoming atmosphere for sharing poetry.

6th Annual Community of Jewish Writers Poetry Reading, Book Sale and Reception June 14
Congregation Agudat Achim is pleased to host the 6th Annual Community of Jewish Writers Poetry Reading, Book Sale and Reception on Sunday, June 14, 3-5 p.m. It will feature poets Susan Comninos, Jay Rogoff and Barbara Ungar:

  • Susan Comninos is a teacher and poet whose work has been widely published in such literary journals as Subtropics, TriQuarterly, Quarterly West, The Cortland Review, Nashville Review, Tulane Review, Judaism, Lilith and Tikkun, among others. Her arts journalism has appeared in such news publications as the Boston Globe, Christian Science Monitor, Jewish Daily Forward and Atlantic Online. In 2010, she won the Yehuda Halevi Poetry Contest run by Tablet magazine.  Later this year, her poetry is forthcoming in the Harvard Review Online, Malahat Review, Subtropics and Catskill Made. Recently, she completed a debut book of poems called Out of Nowhere. She has taught creative writing at the University of Michigan, RPI, the Troy Arts Center, Schenectady JCC and Temple Sinai in Saratoga.
  • Jay Rogoff has published five books of poetry, most recently Venera (2014), a consideration of love and art; The Art of Gravity (2011), a collection obsessed with dance; and The Long Fault (2008), which deals with history and mortality, all published by Louisiana State University Press. His poems have appeared in many journals, including AGNI, The Georgia Review, The Hudson Review, Literary Imagination, Ploughshares, Salmagundi and The Southern Review. He serves as dance critic for The Hopkins Review and also writes on dance for Ballet Review, The Saratogian and other publications. He lives in Saratoga Springs and teaches at Skidmore College. His next book of poems, Enamel Eyes: A Fantasia on 1870 Paris, will appear from LSU in 2016.
  • Barbara Ungar’s latest book of poetry, Immortal Medusa, was released in 2015. She is also the author of Charlotte Bronte, You Ruined My Life, Thrift and The Origin of the Milky Way, which won the Gival Press Poetry Award, a Silver Independent Publishers’Award, a Hoffer Award and the Adirondack Center for Writing Poetry Award.  She is the author of the chapbooks Sequel and Neoclassical Barbra, as well as Haiku in English. She has published poems in journals such as Rattle, Salmagundi and The Nervous Breakdown. A professor of English at The College of St. Rose, Ungar directs the MFA program there.

There will be a poetry reading, panel discussion, book sale and reception. Free and open to the public. Congregation Agudat Achim, 2117 Union Street, Niskayuna, NY 12309.

Third Thursday to feature Mike Jurkovic June 18
Poet Mike Jurkovic will read from his work at the Social Justice Center, 33 Central Avenue, Albany on Thursday,  June 18, at 7:30 p.m. Mike Jurkovic is the co-director of Calling All Poets in Beacon, NY, & producer of CAPSCAST, live recordings from the series. His most recent collection of poems is Eve’s Venom (Post Traumatic Press, 2014).

A reading by a local or regional poet is held each Third Thursday at the Social Justice Center. The event includes an open mic for audience members to read. Sign-up starts at 7 p.m., with the reading beginning at 7:30. The host of the readings is Albany poet and photographer Dan Wilcox. The suggested donation is $3, which helps support this and other poetry programs of the Poetry Motel Foundation and the work of the Social Justice Center. For more information about this event contact Dan Wilcox, 518/482-0262; e-mail: dwlcx@earthlink.net.

Celebration of Women’s Voices Conference – Women Writers Past and Present
Wallkill Valley Writers will celebrate the publication of a second anthology on June 27, 7-9 p.m. at Boughton Place, 150 Kisor Road, Highland, New York. These writers are extraordinary because they take the stuff of daily life, fire it in the kiln of imagination and produce works of art that glisten with the joys and sorrows of human experience. You are invited to celebrate as they claim writing as their art.

Readers include: Bythema Bagley, Claudia Battaglia, Tim Brennan, Gloria Caviglia, Susan Chute, Greg Correll, Meg Dunne, Barbara Edelman, Kim Ellis, Jeanne-Marie Fleming, Allison Friedman, Colleen Geraghty, Kate Hymes, Barbara Martin, Linda Melick, Barry Menuez, RoseMarie Navarra, Jennifer “Jen” Roy.

See www.wallkillvalleywriters.com for more information. In addition, you can find a Facebook page originally created for the Conference but now a bulletin board for writers here.

“2,” Call for submissions: Poets and prose writers of 2nd Sunday @ 2
“2nd Sunday @ 2” co-hosts Dan Wilcox and Nancy Klepsch invite poets and prose writers that have attended our open mic to submit two poems or two pages of prose for publication in our first chapbook called, what else, “2.” The deadline is July 2nd, 2015. Please submit your work in MS Word, 12-point type, Times Roman, spell-checked, etc., by July 2, 2015, to nsktroy@aol.com; please type “2 submission” in the subject line.

Space is limited, so we ask you to consider the length of poems.  Preference will be given to long-time and consistent attendees.  One copy of the chapbook will be provided free of charge to 2nd Sunday poets and prose writers published in our chapbook at our September 13 open mic, which will officially begin our 6th season. You may also purchase copies for $2 at one of our open mics throughout the 2015-16 2nd Sunday Open Mic season.

Thank you so much for supporting our open mic.

Springfield (Missouri) Writers Guild invites HVWG members & others to submit to writing contest
Springfield Writers’ Guild announces its 22nd Annual Prose and Poetry Contest, June 15 – September 15. Here are the details:

  • Fee: $5 per entry. No limit to number of entries, but the same entry may not be entered in more than one category.
  • Prose Division: Maximum 1,000 words, double-spaced. Categories: 1) fiction, any genre; 2) nonfiction, any subject & 3) humorous.
  • Poetry Division: Maximum one page, single-spaced. Categories: 4) humorous, any form & 5) any subject, any form.
  • Awards each category 1-5: First Place $50, Second Place $25, Third Place $15, Two Honorable Mentions.
  • Jim Stone Memorial Poetry Division: Fee $5, one entry per person. Entry must not have been entered in Categories 4 or 5. Poetry any subject, any form. One page, single spaced. Awards this division: First Place $150, Second Place $75, Third Place $50, Two Honorable Mentions.
  • Best of Springfield Writers’ Guild Award: SWG members who enter any category automatically will be considered for a $100 award at no additional entry fee and in addition to other awards they may receive. This category judged separately.
  • Bonus for SWG Members: Submit two entries and receive a special link to submit a third entry free of charge.

Submission Guidelines

  1. Read these guidelines carefully. Failure to follow the guidelines may disqualify your entry.
  2. Contest period is 12:01 a.m. Central Time, June 15, 2015, to midnight Central Time, September 15, 2015. Entries and fees will be accepted only during the contest period and only at www.Submittable.com; see link at www.springfieldwritersguild.org/contests.html. Payment by debit card, credit card or PayPal. Each entry must be unpublished, original work of contestant and entered in only one category. You keep all rights to your entries; entries will not be published.
  3. Double space prose, single space poetry. Title each entry except haiku. A list of your entries will be accessible at www.Submittable.com. Enter the prose word count or poetry form in the box provided. Number prose pages. Do not put your name on entries.
  4. Once an entry is submitted to Submittable, it will not be extracted or exchanged for another entry for any reason. Writers may resubmit another entry accompanied with the $5 fee.
  5. Awards will be presented at the Springfield Writer’s Guild meeting, October 24, 2015, or by mail for those unable to attend. For a list of winning entries and judges, visit www.springfieldwritersguild.org/contests.html after October 24, 2015.

Questions? Contact Contest Chair, Yvonne Erwin: writer716@gmail.com.

Berkshire Festival of Women Writers Summer Leadership Institute for Teen Girls & Young Women
The Berkshire Festival of Women Writers announces a week-long Leadership Institute for teen girls and young women ages 13 – 18, to be held July 20 – 24 from 1 – 5 p.m. at The Mount in Lenox, MA. Led by Jennifer Browdy, Ph.D., founding director of the Berkshire Festival of Women Writers, with college senior Grace Rossman, the writing-intensive Institute, called “The Butterfly Effect,” will give girls the tools, strategies and confidence they need to step into leadership roles as they pursue their interests and passions.

Participants will build community as they share their ideas with each other in guided writing sessions, theater and public speaking workshops, multimedia presentations and in-depth discussions on the issues most important to young women today. The week will culminate in a reception at which the young women will speak their truths for an audience of parents and friends.

“We’re invoking the image of the butterfly both as a symbol of transformation, and because of the saying that the wind from one butterfly’s wings can change the world,” says Dr. Browdy, a professor of literature, writing and media studies at Bard College at Simon’s Rock. “Our aim is to awaken teen girls and young women to the power of their own voices, both written and spoken, and to give them techniques they can take out into the world to make a difference on issues they care about. And to have fun doing it, too!”

The summer week-long workshop will be followed by monthly Leadership Circles for Teen Girls and Young Women starting in September at different locations in Berkshire County. Participants will also have a chance to join the Berkshire Festival of Women Writers Youth Advisory Board and to contribute to an anthology of young women’s writing forthcoming from Green Fire Press.<

Tuition is $500; some full and partial scholarships will be available. The application deadline is June 21, 2015.  For more information, visit www.berkshirewomenwriters.org or email info@berkshirewomenwriters.org.

Registration open for two workshops with Pat Schneider assisted by Kate Hymes
Everyone is a writer. Those who do not write stories or poems tell them, sing them, and, in so doing they are writing on the air. Creating with words is our continuing passion. We dream stories, make up stories, poems, songs, and tell them to ourselves. —Pat Schneider

  • How the Light Gets In: Writing as a Spiritual Practice, June 27. Registration fee $200. Pat Schneider will guide writers on an inner journey of spiritual awareness.  The writing will gently and with grace lead you to find and explore the cracks of memory, grief and absence, failure, anger and pain in order to let the light the in, to let your light shine. The light you discover will illuminate the joy, forgiveness, quest for justice, and the comedy of being human. Pat describes writing as a form of prayer that allows us to praise, give thanksgiving, to rage, or to open one’s inner self and listen. Writing as spiritual practice of follows no established path or way. Pat quotes Rumi, “There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground.” She continues in her own words: I suspect there are as many variations on the experience of mystery as here are human persons. Write with Pat and find your path, your way.
  • You Are a Writer: A Weekend Writing Retreat, September 11-13. Registration fee: $420. Commuter registration: $420 plus $90 (facilities and meals) = $510. Overnight registration: $420 plus $190 (2 nights lodging) = $615. Pat Schneider says that it isn’t discipline we lack, but belief in our art, our creativity and in ourselves. Over a more than 40-year career leading writing workshops, she has helped novice and experienced writers believe in their stories and their ability to write them. She has developed a practice, the Amherst Writers and Artists method, that leads writers to write what they know and what they don’t know they know, to tell their deepest truth and to know that their deepest writing is their best writing. Commit to writing as your art. Experience personally writing with Pat who has been called “the wisest teacher of writing.”

About Pat
Pat is a poet, playwright, librettist and author of 10 books of poetry and non-fiction. She was born in the Ozark mountains of Missouri where she became intimate with fossils, creek beds, grasshoppers and box turtles. After a search for work took her single mother to St. Louis, from age 10 Pat lived in tenements and in an orphanage until she was given a scholarship to college. Those early experiences have deeply influenced her writing and fueled her passion for those who have been denied voice through poverty and other misfortunes.

Pat’s libretto, “The Lament of Michal,” was performed in Carnegie Hall by Phyllis Bryn Julson and the Atlanta Symphony directed by Robert Shaw. Her poetry has been read by Garrison Keillor on National Public Radio’s Writer’s Almanac 16 times.  A film about her work with women in low-income housing, titled “Tell Me Something I Can’t Forget,” is included in the DVD companion to her book Writing Alone and With Others.

Amherst Writers & Artists, founded by Pat in 1981 and directed and managed by Pat and Peter for 30 years, is now an international network of workshop leaders who use the writing method described in Writing Alone and With Others. Pat’s newest book, How the Light Gets In: Writing as a Spiritual Practice, was released from Oxford University Press in April 2013.

To register for either workshop and get more information about fee schedules and deadlines, visit www.wallkillvalleywriters.com.

Cornell University Press to publish book by James Schlett of Rotterdam
On June 30, Cornell University Press will publish A Not Too Greatly Changed Eden: The Story of the Philosophers’ Camp in the Adirondacks by James Schlett, of Rotterdam. The book tells the definitive story of the historic Philosophers’ Camp, an August 1858 gathering at Follensby Pond of 19th century America’s leading intellectuals, including the transcendentalist philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson, the Harvard scientist Louis Agassiz and the Cambridge poet James Russell Lowell. They were led into the Adirondack wilderness by William James Stillman, a painter originally from Schenectady who co-founded the nation’s first art journal, the Crayon.

In this book, Schlett recounts the story of the Philosophers’ Camp from the lives and careers of — and friendships and frictions among — the participants to the extensive preparations for the expedition and the several-day encampment to its lasting legacy. Schlett’s account is a sweeping tale that provides vistas of the dramatically changing landscapes of the United States in the second half of the nineteenth century. As he relates, the scholars later formed an Adirondack Club that set out to establish a permanent encampment at nearby Ampersand Pond. Their plans, however, were dashed amid the outbreak of the Civil War and the advancement of civilization into a wilderness that Stillman described as “a not too greatly changed Eden.”

But the Adirondacks were indeed changing. When Stillman returned to the site of the Philosophers’ Camp in 1884, he found the woods around Follensby had been disfigured by tourists. Development, industrialization and commercialization had transformed the Adirondack wilderness as they would nearly every other aspect of the American landscape. Such devastation would later inspire conservationists to establish Adirondack Park in 1892. At the close of the book, Schlett looks at the preservation of Follensby Pond, now protected by the Nature Conservancy and the camp site’s potential integration into the Adirondack Forest Preserve.

* * *

Editor’s Note

I enjoy putting together this newsletter for the HVWG. As a member of the Guild and a working writer in our community, I recognize its incredible value and hope it is a terrific resource for you, as well. Please let me know if there’s anything we can do to improve it.

Here are some housekeeping notes:

    • Want your news item published in a future newsletter? Submit it to me at hvwgnews@gmail.com. The deadline each month is the 25th, and the newsletter publishes on (or around) the 1st. Please note: All announcements are subject to editing.
    • Please do not submit your announcement as a PDF. All copy for announcements must be in the body of an email or attached as a Word document.
    • PLEASE INDICATE IF YOU ARE A MEMBER when submitting your publication credits and readings (personal accomplishments). If you indicate you are an active member, I can place your announcement in the member section; otherwise, it will be placed under “area announcements.”
  • Got issues with the newsletter formatting? other feedback? Please email that same address: hvwgnews@gmail.com.
  • The Hudson Valley Writers Guild offers space in its newsletter for submission and program opportunities but does not endorse any programs or publications that are not offered through the Guild.

~Carolee

To unsubscribe from this list, please email hvwginfo@gmail.com with your request.

Hudson Valley Writers Guild Newsletter, May 2015

IN THIS ISSUE

Guild Announcements:

  • Submission guidelines for the HVWG 2015 Poetry Contest

Member Announcements:

  • Tom Swyers’ Novel Saving Babe Ruth wins Benjamin Franklin Book Awards

Area Announcements:

  • Book shop at Feed and Seed Building in Kinderhook reopens May 2
  • Poetry course starting May 12 – “Love, Technology: Poems Written in the Digital Age”
  • Arthur’s Market and Cafe’ Open-Mic features Mimi Moriarty May 13
  • Third Thursday to feature Barbara Ungar May 21
  • Reading of  “Song of Myself”  May 31
  • Illustrator wanted!

GUILD ANNOUNCEMENTS

Submission guidelines for the HVWG 2015 Poetry Contest
The Hudson Valley Writers Guild is pleased to announce this year’s poetry contest. Cash prizes will be awarded to first ($100), second ($75) and third place ($50) poems. The winning poets will be invited to read their winning submissions at a program in the fall.

Here are the guidelines:

  • All contestants must be residents of New York State.
  • The entry fee is $10 for HVWG members and $15 for non-members. Checks made payable to HVWG must accompany submissions. If $30 membership fee is paid with submission, please enclose a separate check.
  • HVWG Board of Directors and their families and/or current or past students and family of judges are ineligible.
  • Entries must be postmarked between June 15 and August 15, 2015.
  • One to three previously unpublished poems may be submitted. Poems must not exceed 40 lines.
  • Contact information must not appear anywhere on the submission.
  • A cover letter must include: name, address, phone number, email, title, and line count.
  • Submissions must be typed using 12-pt. Times New Roman or Cambria font.
  • Send three hard copies by mail. No email submissions. Please no pornography or erotica.
  • Mail submissions and entry fee to: HVWG CONTEST c/o Jan Tramontano, 14 Brookwood Avenue, Albany, NY  12203

This year’s judges are Howard Kogan and Cheryl A.Rice.

Howard Kogan is an award winning poet whose work has appeared in many literary journals including Still Crazy, Occupoetry, Poetry Ark, Naugatuck River Review, Jewish Currents Anthology (2014), Jewish Currents Calendar (2015), Writer’s Haven, Farming Magazine, Literary Gazette, Pathways, Up the River, Point Mass Anthology and Misfit Magazine. He has also published a book of poems,Indian Summer, and a chapbook, General Store Poems.

In 2011 he was the Poet Laureate of Smith’s Tavern, Voorheesville, NY.  He was a finalist in the second Annual Jewish Currents Dora and Alexander Raynes Poetry Competition, a semi-finalist in the Naugatuck River Review Annual Contest (2014) and one of three first place winners of the Rensselaerville Festival of Writers Poetry Contest (2014).

Cheryl A. Rice’s work has appeared in Baltimore Review, Chronogram, Florida Review, Home Planet News, Mangrove, The Temple and Woodstock Times, and in the anthologies,Wildflowers, Vol. II (2002: Shivastan Publishing), For Enid With Love (2010: NY Quarterly Books) and A Slant of Light  (2013:Codhill Press), among others. She is the author of Moses Parts the Tulips (2013: APD Press), My Minnesota Boyhood (2012: Post Traumatic Press) and Auction (2004, Flying Monkey Press; 2nd edition 2010). Her CDs are: “Nobody Slept Last Night” (2003, Another Poor Bastard Productions) and “Girl Poet” (2007, Flying Monkey Productions).

She is also founder and host of the Sylvia Plath Bake-Off. Her poetry blog, Flying Monkey Productions, may be found at http://flyingmonkeyprods.blogspot.com/.

All entrants will be notified of winners by email unless a SASE is provided. Results will be posted on our website: http://hvwg.org.

Contact Jan Tramontano at jantramontano@gmail.com for more information.

MEMBER ANNOUNCEMENTS

Tom Swyers’ Novel Saving Babe Ruth wins Benjamin Franklin Book Awards
Member Tom Swyers’ novel Saving Babe Ruth earned two Benjamin Franklin Book Awards at the 27th annual Independent Book Publisher Association’s conference and awards ceremony held in Austin, Texas, on April 10. Saving Babe Ruth was awarded gold for “Best First Book Fiction” 2015 and silver for “Best Popular Fiction” for 2015.

Tom is scheduled to speak about Saving Babe Ruth at the Albany Institute of History and Art on May17 at 2 p.m. and at the Norman Rockwell Museum on May 30.

AREA ANNOUNCEMENTS

Book shop at Feed and Seed Building in Kinderhook reopens May 2
The Friends of the Kinderhook Memorial Library Book Shop at the Feed and Seed Building will re-open on May 2. The shop will be completely re-stocked with hundreds of new and gently used books for adults and children, all at affordable prices. The Friends’ book collection includes vintage, collectible and contemporary fiction and non-fiction. Each week a special collection will be highlighted and new books will be added as donations come into the Library.

The Book Shop will be open every Saturday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. through mid-October. The Feed and Seed building is located at 24 Hudson Street in the Village of Kinderhook. For more information about the Friends and other Library programs, please visit the Kinderhook Memorial Library website: http://www.oklibrary.org.

Poetry course starting May 12 – “Love, Technology: Poems Written in the Digital Age”
Irony, brevity, self-focus: all are the calling cards of communication in the Digital Age. But, to quote the poet Donald Hall, “Does it end there?” Today’s poetry often references the Internet, Twitter and our personal lives as mediated through screen time. In the face of what’s trending, how do we tease out what literature will last and what kind of writing will be gone in the time that it takes to say “screen shot”?

Join poet Susan Comninos in exploring poetry that’s set within our cultural moment, while trying your hand at writing poems of lasting value. This 8-week series, from May 12 to June 30, will include the reading and discussion of published poems and their techniques, as well as the reading and discussion of student work.

Susan Comninos has recently published poems in Subtropics, TriQuarterly, Quarterly West, The Cortland Review, Nashville Review, Lilith, Tikkun and Gastronomica, among others. Later this year, her poetry is forthcoming in the Harvard Review Online, Malahat Review, Subtropics and Catskill Made. In 2010, she won the Yehuda Halevi Poetry Contest run by Tabletmagazine. She has taught poetry at the University of Michigan, RPI, Troy Arts Center, Schenectady JCC and Temple Sinai. She currently lives in Guilderland.

Classes are held at the Schenectady JCC in the Farber/Miness Gallery. The JCC is located at 2565 Balltown Road, Niskayuna. The cost for Schenectady JCC members and returning poetry students is $85; new students, $110. Enroll at the Schenectady JCC or by calling (518) 377-8803.

Arthur’s Market and Cafe’ Open-Mic features Mimi Moriarty May 13
Second Wednesday open mic and featured poet May 13 at Arthur’s Market & Café, 35 N. Ferry Street, Schenectady. Featured poet: Mimi Moriarty. Mimi’s many published works include two chapbooks from Finishing Line Press: War Psalm and Sibling Reverie (written with her brother Frank Disiderio). Another chapbook, Crows Calling, is from Foothills Publishing. She has presented at many local and regional venues.

Sign-up starts at 7 p.m.; readings begin at 7:30. Hosted by Catherine Norr. Good food, beverages and cozy, welcoming ambiance!

Third Thursday to feature Barbara Ungar May 21
Poet Barbara Ungar will read from her work at the Social Justice Center, 33 Central Avenue, Albany, on Thursday, May 21 at 7:30 p.m. Barbara Ungar is a professor of English at the College of Saint Rose in Albany, NY; she directs the MFA program there. Among her books of poetry are Charlotte Brontë, You Ruined My Life, The Origin of the Milky Way and the recently published Immortal Medusa (The Word Works, 2015).

A reading by a local or regional poet is held each Third Thursday at the Social Justice Center. The event includes an open mic for audience members to read. Sign-up starts at 7 p.m., with the reading beginning at 7:30. The host of the readings is Albany poet and photographer Dan Wilcox. The suggested donation is $3, which helps support this and other poetry programs of the Poetry Motel Foundation and the work of the Social Justice Center. For more information about this event contact Dan Wilcox, (518) 482-0262 or dwlcx@earthlink.net.

Reading of  “Song of Myself”  May 31
Poets and other citizens will gather on Sunday, May 31, at 6 p.m. at the Robert Burns statue in Washington Park in Albany, NY, to celebrate the birthday of the quintessential American poet, Walt Whitman, with a reading of his poem “Song of Myself.” The event is sponsored by the Poetry Motel Foundation and the Hudson Valley Writers Guild. It is free and open to the public. Persons interested in reading a section of Whitman’s poem can sign up to read at the event.

Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819, at West Hills, NY, near Huntington on Long Island. “Song of Myself,” composed of over 1,300 lines in 52 sections, first appeared in Whitman’sLeaves of Grass in 1855. The poem went through a number of revisions and changes until the 1881 edition of Leaves of Grass. Whitman died in 1892 in Camden, NJ. The theme of “Song of Myself,” as indeed it is of most of Whitman’s work, is the celebration of the individual, of the nation and of the spiritual possibility within us all.

The Robert Burns statue is located in Albany’s Washington Park, along the park road that parallels Willett Street and the intersection of Hudson Avenue. The reading will take place rain or shine; it is suggested that the public brings chairs or blankets to sit on.  For more information call or email Dan Wilcox at dwlcx@earthlink.net or visit the Guild’s website, www.hvwg.org.

Illustrator wanted!
A note from Jeff Marden: “I am seeking an illustrator for a children’s book for 2-8 year olds. The illustrations need to be colored pencil drawings. The theme personality is moderate fantasy taking place in a city neighborhood with traditional brownstone houses. If interested in discussing please contact Jeff Marden, Jeff@MardenConsulting.com. Thank you.”

Hudson Valley Writers Guild Newsletter, April 2015

Hudson Valley Writers Guild Newsletter

Important note: Do not submit news items for future newsletters by replying to this email. INSTEAD, please send news items to hvwgnews@gmail.com. Thank you!

IN THIS ISSUE

Guild Announcements:

  • HVWG announces winners of Take Back the Night poetry contest

Member Announcements:

  • “No excuses: Writing & selling your book” class offered by Pauline Bartel
  • Tom Swyer’s novel Saving Babe Ruth is award finalist
  • A.P.D. announces publication of Coyote: Poems of Suburban Living
  • Alan Catlin shares Misfit Magazine news
  • Update on Schenectady County poet laureate from Bill Poppino

Area Announcements:

  • Caffè Lena presents Karen Skolfield & Bunkong Tuon April 1
  • Rensselaerville Library’s “10 Days/10 Poetry Events/10th Annual Poetry Month Celebration”
  • Pine Hollow Open Mic Series announces 2015 featured poets
  • Third Thursday to feature poet Michele Battiste April 16
  • Roeliff Jansen Community Library announces upcoming literary events
  • Bernadette Mayer’s summer poetry workshop almost filled (sign up now)
  • “Albany Reads: Books and Bites,” April 25
  • Writers in the Mountains presents “Significance of Story” workshop starting April 20
  • Writers in the Mountains presents nature writing workshop starting May 9
  • A Weekend Writing Retreat with Pat Schneider assisted by Kate Hymes, September 11-13
  • Canadian novelist seeks light-hearted, true accounts of senior living

GUILD ANNOUNCEMENTS

HVWG announces winners of Take Back the Night poetry contest
In conjunction with the Take Back the Night program and walk against violence against women, HVWG hosted a poetry contest. Held at The College of St. Rose on April 21 at 4:30 p.m., the program will include a reading of the winning entries.

Faith Green and Andrea Portnick lead the contest and with HVWG announce two winners: the winning poem “For Her, For Love” by H.L. Martin and “Another America Not Seen” by Joseph Phillip De Marco.

For Her, For Love
by H. L. Martin

You have to watch him raise another child,
because at twenty three
you are too old to testify
to what he did to you all of those years,
and what those years do to you now.

I watch you give your children the best
your mother gave to you,
and more. You know what a good investment
a child is. You love them and who they will become.
Once faced with another’s selfishness, you rise valiantly above.

At fourteen you forfeited your chance for justice,
to protect your sister,
and your brothers from being taken
away from your mother. You lost your grandmother,
and I lost my mother, when she took the wrong side.

We have to watch him raise another child,
she is five years old
and alone with him,
in the house where decals hide the numbers
and the law keeps us at bay.

*

Another America Not Seen
By Joseph Phillip De Marco

The dark face of hunger, desperation, and gutter pain are not felt in high places,

the callousness is not seen, legally it exists in our genes, along with sirens, and flashing lights.

Spartan and Trojan beggars fight the masses’ wicked spears on the cold silted streets,

unnoticed when the acid rain falls intentionally, covering guilt and shame;

tithing to God insures no ties nor blame for defeated men.

I walk with you, o’blighted souls. I breathe the same air that you breathe;

finding no peace, no place; I worry someday it would be me, and I say nay, never me!

So it will come; all disappointments following into my grave.

So it will be me, as I hang my hat before my witness,  I learned.

I surrender all reluctantly before I leave.

and if they read; it matters not, as no amount of light can force them to see what they out to see!

MEMBER ANNOUNCEMENTS

“No excuses: Writing & selling your book” class offered by Pauline Bartel
A course for aspiring authors interested in writing and selling books will be held on Thursdays, April 23, 30 and May 7 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at SUNY Adirondack, 640 Bay Road, Queensbury, NY. “No Excuses: Writing and Selling Your Book” is offered through continuing education. Course fee is $59, which includes a coursebook. To register, telephone (518) 743-2238.

Instructor Pauline Bartel will discuss the step-by-step process of transforming an idea into a published book, including creating a book proposal, finding agents and publishers and guiding a book to publishing success. Bartel is an award-winning writer and the author of seven published books. She is a member of the prestigious American Society of Journalists and Authors. Visit her website (www.paulinebartel.com) for further information.

Tom Swyer’s novel Saving Babe Ruth is award finalist
Published in June 2014, Tom Swyers’ novel, Saving Babe Ruth, is a finalist in two categories of the Independent Book Publisher Association’s annual Benjamin Franklin Awards. The two categories are “Popular Fiction” and “Best First Book: Fiction.”

The book is based on a true story. When washed-out lawyer and Civil War buff David Thompson takes charge of the kids’ baseball league in town, he must use all of his legal and survival skills to endure a wild, humor-laced thrill ride through an underworld filled with secrets and double lives that threaten his team, his league, his marriage, his family and his life.

Swyer’s book was in the newspapers and on the television last fall when it caused one local town to have a public hearing over its high school principal. A book trailer for Saving Babe Ruth covers those events.

Tom plans to talk about this and other adventures he’s had with Saving Babe Ruth when he speaks at a book signing at the Albany Institute of History and Art on May 17 at 2 pm. The talk is free with paid admission to the museum.

Tom has set aside a limited number of free Kindle copies of Saving Babe Ruth for HVWG members. You can request one by dropping him a note swyerstom@gmail.com.

A.P.D. announces publication of Coyote: Poems of Suburban Living
A.P.D. (Another Poetic Disaster) announces the publication of Coyote: Poems of suburban living, by Dan Wilcox. This chapbook of six poems is #11 in The Bob Kaufman Series of A.P.D.’s (Aged PoeticDynasty) inexpensive chapbooks of works by Albany poets. The poems were variously inspired by viewing suburban life second-hand from the safety of the city and by random remarks made late at night on Facebook. (No real coyotes were harmed in the writing of these poems.)

Charlie Rossiter (www.poetrypoetry.com), Chicago poet and founding member of the poetry performance group “3 Guys from Albany,” describes Coyote this way: “Dan Wilcox knows coyote and what happens when the trickster comes to town. Like the life force itself, coyote roars through the air-conditioned nightmare of suburbia luring housewives to run naked in the night while their husbands sit clueless in front of TV sports, ravages hapless family pets and lovingly cares for her young. (Shapeshifting coyote takes human form and switches gender at will). Wilcox’s insight into coyote is particularly impressive considering that he is an adamantly urban poet who has been known to wear a sport coat on a weekend camping trip.”

Copies of Coyote may be ordered by sending a check for $4 payable to “A.P.D.” to 280 South Main Ave., Albany, NY  12208, or they may be purchased for $3 from the poet at readings and open mics.

Alan Catlin shares Misfit Magazine news
Alan writes: The Lucky #13 issue of Misfit Magazine is now up and ready for your reading pleasure at misfitmagazine.net. This issue was our theme issue — Deadly Sins — and we received all kinds of terrific work. I hope you will enjoy reading as much as we did putting it together. Lucky 13 is also something of a double issue with over 40 new poems and with dozens of reviews, almost three times as many as any previous issue. Please note that I will be taking a sabbatical from April 15 until June 1, when I will again be reading for the next issue, which will be an open one. There may be one of our interim “half issues” towards the end of May also, so stay tuned for future announcements.

Update on Schenectady County poet laureate from Bill Poppino
Stephen H. Swartz has just been re-appointed poet laureate for Schenectady County by its legislature through July 31, 2018. He was initially appointed for a three year term in 2009 and has been a ‘hold-over’ from 2012 until now. Back in 2008, New York State had 12 county poet laureates, but none in the Capital District. This seemed strange to HVWG member Bill Poppino, so following his presentation to the County Library Board, the Legislature appointed a five-person selection committee, including Philip Morris (CEO of Proctors), Jim McCord (Union College) and representatives from three other county schools. Since appointed in 2009, Steve has been a regular presenter at the “Community of Writers” event held in November at the Schenectady Main Library.

AREA ANNOUNCEMENTS

Caffè Lena presents Karen Skolfield & Bunkong Tuon April 1
On Wednesday, April 1, Caffè Lena will present poetry readings by Karen Skolfield and Bunkong Tuon. An open reading will follow. Doors open for sign-ups at 7 p.m., and the readings will start at 7:30. The host for the event will be Carol Graser, and the cost is $5. Caffè Lena, 47 Phila Street, Saratoga Springs, (518) 583-0022www.caffelena.org.

Karen Skolfield’s book Frost in the Low Areas (2013) won the 2014 PEN New England Award in poetry and the First Book Award from Zone 3 Press and was a “Must-Read” Massachusetts book for 2014. She is a 2014 winner of the 2014 Split This Rock poetry prize and the 2012 Oboh Prize from Boxcar Poetry Review. Skolfield is the poetry editor forAmherst Live and contributing editor at the literary magazines Tupelo Quarterly and Stirring. She teaches writing to engineers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Bunkong Tuon teaches in the English department at Union College. His poetry and nonfiction works have appeared or are forthcoming in The Paterson Literary Review, The New York Quarterly, The Massachusetts Review, The Más Tequila Review, Numéro Cinq, Misfit Magazine and Nerve Cowboy, among others. Gruel, his first full-length collection of poems, is forthcoming by NYQ Books.

Rensselaerville Library’s “10 Days/10 Poetry Events/10th Annual Poetry Month Celebration”
March 28 – April 26. Sponsored by the Rensselaerville Library. Dedicated to the Memory of Poet Galway Kinnell.

Save these dates, mark your calendars and forward to friends:

  • March 28, 10:30 am -12:30 p.m., “Visual Poetry/Words & Images Workshop” (Katrinka Moore).
  • April 2, 7-8 p.m., “April Foolishness: Nonsense & Rhymes“ (reading & sharing of favorite silly poems with Maryann Ronconi).
  • April 9, 7-9 p.m., “Poems Without Form: Prose Poem“ (reading & sharing of poems, followed by writing of prose poems, with Diane Gallo).
  • April 16, 7-9 p.m., “Writing in Form: From Haiku to Sonnet” (discussion & sharing of poems, followed by writing of poems in form from 8-9 with Linda Sonia Miller).
  • April 17, 5:30 p.m., “Storytime – Poetry, Pizza & Crafts for Kids.”
  • April 18, 4 p.m. at the Way-Out Gallery, “Post-It Poetry” (sharing & writing of short poems – on 3×3 post-its – and music, too with Nancy Dyer & Peter Boudreaux).
  • April 19, 3 p.m., Art Opening & Poetry Salon at the Way-Out Gallery. Enjoy a Galway Kinnell tribute (Ginny Carter), art opening & installation, music, wine and readings (by Peter Boudreaux, Alan Casline,Tom Corrado, Cassandra Halleh, Susan Kayne, Howard Kogan, Linda Sonia Miller, Katrinka Moore, Mimi Moriarty & Dan Wilcox).
  • April  21, 7-8 p.m., “Robert Frost, A Poet Connected to Nature” (presentation by Huyck Preserve researchers Sue Beatty & Owen Sholes).
  • April 26, 2-4 p.m. at Conkling Hall, “10th Annual Favorite Poem Project: Galway Kinnell Dedication and an afternoon of poetry & refreshments” (bring a favorite and/or original poem to read aloud or just come and listen – Claire North, emcee).
  • April 30, 5:30-9 p.m., “Western/Cowgirl/Cowboy Poetry at the Palmer House Cafe.“ Reserve a chuck wagon dinner at the cafe at 5:30 and/or enjoy poetry and music inspired by a life “on the range” beginning at 7 p.m. (Janet Botaish)

For complete details and updates, visit www.rensselaervillelibrary.org. All events will be held at the Rensselaerville Library, unless otherwise specified. Any questions? Contact Linda Sonia Miller, poetry events coordinator, at (518) 416-2776.

Pine Hollow Open Mic Series announces 2015 featured poets
Poets of earth, water, tree & sky! Featured poets at Pine Hollow Open Mic Series 2015:

  • Friday, April 10: Alifare Skebe
  • Friday, May 8: John Roach
  • Saturday, May 30: Celebrating 50 Years of Planting (a performance with a 7 p.m. start; Sue Spencer, drums; Michael Czarnecki, voice)
  • Friday, June 12: Deborah Poe
  • Friday, July 10: Alan Catlin
  • Friday, August 14: Celebrating 50 Years of Planting – 7th Annual Poets at the Arboretum (group reading)
  • Friday, September 11: Tom Corrado – World Premiere Performance Poetry: Knapp’s Last Tape…Screendumped
  • Friday, October 9: Brenda Coultas
  • Friday, November 13: Philomena Moriarty & Sam Trumbore

All events are at Pine Hollow Arboretum Visitor Center, 16 Maple Avenue, Slingerlands, NY, at 6:30 PM. Includes open mic for poets and writers. Sponsored by Rootdrinker Institute, Hudson Valley Writers Guild and the Delmar Writers Group.

Third Thursday to feature poet Michele Battiste April 16
Poet Michele Battiste will read from her work at the Social Justice Center, 33 Central Avenue, Albany, on Thursday, April 16, at 7:30 p.m. Michele Battiste is the author ofUprising (2014) and Ink for an Odd Cartography (2009), both published by Black Lawrence Press.  A Schenectady native raised on the Albany poetry scene, she now lives in Colorado, where she raises funds for organizations undoing corporate evil.

A reading by a local or regional poet is held each Third Thursday at the Social Justice Center. The event includes an open mic for audience members to read. Sign-up starts at 7 p.m., with the reading beginning at 7:30. The host of the readings is Albany poet and photographer Dan Wilcox. The suggested donation is $3, which helps support this and other poetry programs of the Poetry Motel Foundation and the work of the Social Justice Center.  For more information about this event contact Dan Wilcox, (518) 482-0262 ordwlcx@earthlink.net.

Roeliff Jansen Community Library announces upcoming literary events
Everyday in April: Poem-a-Day Challenge and a May 1 Open Mic / Roeliff Jansen Community Library is announcing the annual April Poem-A-Day Challenge. For the fourth consecutive year, Great Barrington poet Janet Hutchinson is sending out daily email poetry writing prompts during the month of April. To receive daily prompts send your email address to: janhutch44@gmail.com. Hutchinson says, “There are now 300 people in 12 states and three foreign countries receiving these prompts. Many people have told me that they did not actually complete 30 poems in April, but said that the five they did write were five more than they might have written otherwise.” Challenge participants are invited to attend an open mic event at the Roe Jan Library to read some of the poems they wrote, on Friday, May 1, 7-8 p.m.

April 25, 4 p.m.: Poet Joan Murray to read at Roe Jan Library as part of Poetry Month Celebration / Prize-winning narrative poet Joan Murray will read from her new collection,Swimming for the Ark: New & Selected Poems 1990-2015, at the Roeliff Jansen Community Library on Saturday, April 25, at 4 p.m. Joan Murray is a poet, writer and playwright, whose books include: Looking for the Parade (W. W. Norton), Dancing on the Edge and Queen of the Mist (both from Beacon Press) and The Same Water (Wesleyan University Press). She is also the editor of The Pushcart Book of Poetry and the Poems to Live By anthologies. This program was made possible in part by a grant from Poets and Writers.

May 3, 1-4 p.m.: Memoir Writing Workshop at Roe Jan Library / A memoir writing workshop, led by writers/teachers Susan Hodara and Joan Potter, will be held at the Roeliff Jansen Community Library. The workshop is free, but pre-registration is required by May 1. In April 2014 the library hosted a panel including Hodara and Potter discussing a memoir they co-authored, Still Here Thinking of You: A Second Chance With Our Mothers. “The enthusiasm for the memoir mini-workshop presented at that event made us want to follow up with a workshop that gives participants more time to write their own stories,” says Cecele Kraus of the Library’s Literature Committee. Hodara and Potter will read selections from their memoirs, answer questions and discuss various aspects of memoir, such as finding a personal voice, conflicting or incomplete memories, and guilt about telling family stories. Participants will write their own stories, and feedback will be offered to as many as time permits. For additional details about the workshop, teachers and registration visit the library website at www.roejanlibrary.org. This workshop is made possible by a grant from The Hudson Valley Writers Guild.

The Roeliff Jansen Community Library, which is chartered to serve Ancram, Copake and Hillsdale, is located at 9091 Rt. 22, approximately one mile south of the light at the intersection of Routes 22 and 23 in Hillsdale. For information on hours and events, call (518) 325-4101 or visit the library’s website at www.roejanlibrary.org.

Bernadette Mayer’s summer poetry workshop almost filled (sign up now)
Bernadette Mayer will lead her continuing workshop series on a summer session beginning in May 2015. She will once again provide participating poets with the opportunity to engage in her language experiments. She will also talk about her mentors and contemporaries and suggest new directions in verse. She will also suggest books you should have to aid in your writing and how to publish your poems. The workshop is not a traditional critique of participant’s previous work but an opportunity to fulfill Bernadette’s creative writing assignments. Completed assignments are then presented to the group and used as springboards for wide ranging discussion. Bernadette will continue to write and distribute new poems for the benefit of workshop participants and subject matter.

Bernadette Mayer’s poetry writing workshop takes place at her home in East Nassau, NY. The workshop will meet on five Saturdays: May 9, June 13, July 11, August 15 and September 12. Each meeting will take place 2-4 p.m. Mayer will facilitate a conducive atmosphere that will bring forth enhanced new poems from each of the participants. Total Cost: $65, including drinks and light refreshments. Workshop limited to eight participants.

Bernadette Mayer (born May 12, 1945, in Brooklyn, NY) is a poet and prose writer. In 1967, she received a BA from New School for Social Research. She has since edited the journal 0 TO 9 with Vito Acconci and the United Artists Press with Lewis Warsh and worked as Director of St. Mark’s Poetry Project. Her new book Helens of Troy is a Spring 2012 release by New Directions. For more than a decade, she and poet Philip Good have lived in East Nassau. From the beginning of this series of workshops in September 2011, she has provided an expansive menu of poetic technique and belief, as well as her careful listening to an appreciative core of workshop participants. New participants are welcome to their lively get togethers.

Contact: email ACASLINE@AOL.COM to reserve your place. The mailing address, if email is not available, is Rootdrinker, P.O. Box 522, Delmar, NY 12054.

“Albany Reads: Books and Bites,” April 25
“Albany Reads” starts in people’s homes. Hosts will invite friends and neighbors to read Gregory Maguire’s Wicked and then come to their homes for a small plates dinner at 6 p.m. to discuss the book. After the dinner parties, there will be a dessert reception for all the participants at the Washington Avenue Branch at 8 p.m. Hosts will collect individual minimum contributions of $40 per person. Participants are responsible for getting a copy of the book. Limited copies will be available at the library’s branches and will be for sale at a discount at The Book House of Stuyvesant Plaza. If you would like to host an “Albany Reads” dinner, please click here. Hosts need to sign up by Friday, April 17. If you would like to attend an Albany Reads dinner, please click here. We will do our best to match you with prospective hosts with space at their homes. Attendees need to sign up by Monday, April 20.

Writers in the Mountains presents “Significance of Story” workshop starting April 20
Dare to write! Writers in the Mountains (WIM) announces its popular 6-week workshop, “The Significance of Story: Threads of Revelation” with Carol Little at the Andes Public Library, Mondays, 6 to 8 p.m., from April 20 to May 25. This class is open to anyone interested in writing about their life. No prior writing experience is required. It all starts with a word, an image or a sentence and a willingness to discover.

Every person’s story is unique, no matter what shared experiences we have had.  We are changed and shaped by what we experience—by our choices, our circumstances and by things that simply happen as we maneuver through life. Stories have personal meaning, turning points and markers. As we remember and write, or write and remember, we bring together parts of ourselves that may have been scattered, hidden or distorted. We gain a deeper understanding for the truth of our lives, and often a greater appreciation for our own journey.

Carol Little, a long time member of WIM, has extensive experience working with groups and with the use of writing for personal expression. She is a psychotherapist in private practice.

To register, call (607) 759-6138 or write to writersinthemountains@gmail.com. To register online, visit writersinthemountains.org, go to “Register Online” page and fill in the registration form. Class fee is $85.

Writers in the Mountains presents nature writing workshop starting May 9
Dare to write! Writers in the Mountains (WIM) announces a 6-week nature-writing workshop, “Seeing Nature in Words” with Leslie T. Sharpe, at the Delaware County Historical Association, 46549 State Hwy 10, Delhi, NY, Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., from May 9 to June 13 (skipping Memorial Day weekend).

Whether one is writing to change the world or simply for the pleasure of recording one’s observations in a notebook, when the relationship between the observer and nature is at the core of a work, the writing is almost always personal and intensely felt. It is this passion that makes the genre so dynamic and also so accessible to read and to write. The goal of this class is to encourage writers to explore their special relationship with the natural world—be it in the Catskill High Peaks or a backyard garden, expressed as a description of a single flower or as an essay probing an environmental issue—in their own true voice.

Leslie T. Sharpe is an author, editor and educator. She has a BA (Phi Beta Kappa and magna cum laude) in Ancient Greek Language and Literature from Wheaton College and received her master’s degree in Ancient Greek from Columbia University, where she was a Woodrow Wilson Fellow. She began her editing career at Farrar, Straus & Giroux and is currently an editorial consultant specializing in literary nonfiction, literary fiction and poetry. A member of the PEN American Center, she is the author of Editing Fact and Fiction: A Concise Guide to Book Editing (Cambridge University Press), which is regarded as a “modern editing classic.”

Sharpe has taught in the undergraduate and graduate writing programs at Columbia University’s School of the Arts; Introduction to Publishing and Editorial Process at City College of New York’s publishing certificate program; and Manuscript Editing at New York University’s certificate program in book publishing. She teaches online courses for the cutting-edge all-media website mediabistro.com, including The Nonfiction Book and Nonfiction Writing Master Class.

Leslie has also a been a regular contributor to Newsday’s “Urban ‘I’” column, and her essays and articles have appeared in a wide variety of publications including the Chicago Tribune, Christian Science Monitor, Global City Review, International Herald Tribune, New York Times, New York Tribune, Philadelphia Inquirer, San Francisco Chronicle andVillage Voice. She recently finished her memoir, Our Fractured, Perfect Selves, and is currently at work on a new book, The Quarry Fox and Other Tales of a Catskill Summer. Her poems for children have appeared in Ladybug Magazine; Who Knew? Catskill Literary Journal; and From the Catskills.

Leslie’s approach, as an editor as well as a writing teacher, is to find the strengths in the work at hand and build on them. That method is rooted in her respect for every writer and their creations. She believes it is especially important that a workshop environment allow writers to feel safe to express themselves and their thoughts and feelings as well as observations—especially when working in those creative nonfiction forms (journaling, personal essay, memoir) that use the first person “I” voice and that speak directly out of one’s personal experience.

To register, call (607) 759-6138 or e-mail writersinthemountains@gmail.com. To register online, visit writersinthemountains.org. This class is $100 if registered by April 18 or $125 thereafter. Partial scholarships may be available.

A Weekend Writing Retreat with Pat Schneider assisted by Kate Hymes, September 11-13
Registration is  open now! Details:

  • Workshop Leader: Pat Schneider
  • Register – www.wallkillvalleywriters.com
  • Registration fee – $420
  • Commuter registration – $420 plus $90 (facilities and meals) = $510. Non-refundable deposit $145 due April 24. Balance $365 due on or before July 17.
  • Overnight registration – $420 plus $190 (2 nights lodging) = $615. Non-refundable deposit $195 due April 24. Balance $420 due on or before July 17.

“Everyone is a writer….Those who do not write stories or poems…tell them, sing them, and, in so doing they are writing on the air. Creating with words is our continuing passion. We dream stories, make up stories, poems, songs, and tell them to ourselves.” —Pat Schneider

Pat Schneider says that it isn’t discipline we lack, but belief in our art, our creativity in ourselves. Over a more than 40-year career leading writing workshops, she has helped novice and experienced writers believe in their stories and their ability to write them. She has developed a practice, the Amherst Writers and Artists method, that leads writers to write what they know and what they don’t know they know, to tell their deepest truth and to know that their deepest writing is their best writing. Commit to writing as your art. Experience personally writing with Pat who has been called “the wisest teacher of writing.”

“Pat is a gifted, exceptional teacher, artist and compassionate human being. She led us from the superficial levels of writing deep into the hidden treasures we all contain and showed us that everyone is truly a writer/artist. She helped us become more courageous and honest – a difficult task! I will be able to finally start writing what I’ve always needed to write. Now I have tools to help me.” — Julia P.

Pat is a poet, playwright, librettist and author of ten books of poetry and non-fiction. She was born in the Ozark mountains of Missouri, where she became intimate with fossils, creekbeds, grasshoppers and box turtles. After a search for work took her single mother to St. Louis, from age 10 Pat lived in tenements and in an orphanage until she was given a scholarship to college. Those early experiences have deeply influenced her writing and fueled her passion for those who have been denied voice through poverty and other misfortunes.

Pat’s libretto, “The Lament of Michal,” was performed in Carnegie Hall by Phyllis Bryn Julson and the Atlanta Symphony directed by Robert Shaw. Her poetry has been read by Garrison Keillor on National Public Radio’s Writer’s Almanac sixteen times.  A film about her work with women in low-income housing, titled “Tell Me Something I Can’t Forget” is included in the DVD companion to her book, Writing Alone and With Others.

Amherst Writers & Artists, founded by Pat in 1981 and directed and managed by Pat and Peter for 30 years, is now an international network of workshop leaders who use the writing method described in Writing Alone and With Others, Oxford University Press.

Pat’s newest book, How the Light Gets In: Writing as a Spiritual Practice, was released from Oxford University Press in April 2013.

Canadian novelist seeks light-hearted, true accounts of senior living
Judy Stoddart, a novelist affiliated with a writers guild in Manitoba, writes: “I am working on a novel involving the day-to-day antics of an Independent Living facility. My request is for light-hearted, true accounts among seniors, family members or staff, but will review any other unique situations that may apply. All names and facilities will be confidential. Your response can be in dialogue, a few sentences or longer; whereas I’ll piece together a story in my own words with your submissions. I will accept all correspondence viajlstod@mts.net until April 30. Please do not send as an attachment but paste in body of email. Subject line to read: “Independent Living.” When published, your acknowledgment will be granted with your permission.”

Judy’s bio includes several publication credits, and she has been accepted for the 2015 Sheldon Oberman Mentorship Program (January 1st – June 15th, 2015). She has just completed a 60,000 word manuscript titled Thirteen Ways to Meet a Woman and a collection of poems titled Crossing the Tracks. Both have been submitted to publishers, but the waiting game can be long before any written material is accepted. She was formerly the editorial assistant for Style Manitoba magazine, where she now continues as a freelance writer.

Hudson Valley Writers Guild Newsletter, March 2015

IN THIS ISSUE

Member Announcements:

  • Linda Freedland seeking Beta reader for her manuscript
  • Letter from my love by Miriam Newell Biskin now available

Area Announcements:

  • Berkshire Festival for Women Writers happening now
  • Celebration of the Activism of Barbara Smith March 3
  • Caffè Lena to present poet Marilyn McCabe March 4
  • “Out of the Mouths of Babes” at Berkshire Festival of Women Writers March 7
  • Second Sunday Open Mic for Poetry & Prose: March 8
  • Arthur’s Market Open Mic to feature Bob Sharkey March 11
  • March 17 deadline for Schoharie Crossing 2015 Writing Contest
  • Third Thursday to feature poet Andy Fogle March 19
  • Vermont author creates March 21 retreat to inspire creativity
  • Technical writer job openings in Albany/Rensselaer

MEMBER ANNOUNCEMENTS

Linda Freedland seeking Beta reader for her manuscript
New HVWG member Linda Freedland writes, “I am looking for a Beta reader for my adult erotic romance. I am currently revising the manuscript based on a review by a professional copy editor. I hope to finish this by early March. I am seeking a reader, preferably female, who enjoys contemporary romance and who will provide me with an unbiased review with comments/suggestions. If interested, please contact me by email at: lwf9408@aol.com.”

Letter from my love by Miriam Newell Biskin now available
Letter from my love by Miriam Newell Biskin is a compilation of letters written by her soldier fiancé during WW2. The self-published book is available online.

AREA ANNOUNCEMENTS

Berkshire Festival for Women Writers happening now
The annual Berkshire Festival of Women Writers is a collaborative, multi-date, multi-venue event dedicated to nourishing and showcasing the voices of women writers of all ages, from many walks of life. Only in the Berkshires is Women’s History Month celebrated with such an outpouring of creativity, with Festival events every day of the month of March.

In 2015 we’ll be celebrating the Fifth Anniversary Season of the Festival in our usual style, with more than 50 readings, lectures, workshops, performances and screenings held at more than 30 Berkshire County venues from Sheffield to North Adams.

Special events to look forward to include a keynote talk by memoirist Dani Shapiro on March 1; a special screening of Pamela Yates’ new film DISRUPTION with a talkback by the filmmaker, in honor of International Women’s Day on March 8; a behind-the-scenes interview with best-selling young adult author Mary Pope Osborne to open the Festival Book Expo event on March 29; a benefit performance directed by Jayne Atkinson-Gill on our closing weekend; and much, much more.

Join us and feel the marvelous momentum of this grand collaborative community celebration! And please support our efforts in any way you can–there are so many ways to get involved, from volunteering to becoming business sponsor or Friend of the Festival.  We can’t do it without you!

For complete Festival information: www.berkshirewomenwriters.org

Celebration of the Activism of Barbara Smith March 3
Rockefeller College, the New York State Writers Institute and SUNY Press invite you to a celebration of the life and work of pioneering activist Barbara Smith. We’ll begin the evening with a panel discussion moderated by Susan Arbetter of The Capitol Pressroom, featuring Barbara and Alethia Jones and Virginia Eubanks, editors of new book, Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around: Forty Years of Movement Building with Barbara Smith (2014). Immediately following the discussion, there will be a dessert reception and book signing with Barbara.

As an organizer, writer, publisher, independent scholar, professor, and elected official, Barbara Smith’s work has shaped scholarship, teaching, and progressive activism that challenges classism, sexism, racism and homophobia.  Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around: Forty Years of Movement Building with Barbara Smith brings to life the controversies, players, and strategies that expanded the definitions of freedom through multiple social movements. After meticulously selecting material from over two hundred articles and interviews, the book juxtaposes hard to find historical documents with new unpublished interviews with fellow activists and scholars. In a clear, conversational style, it engages readers in fundamental questions that can deepen their social justice work and heighten their integrity, accountability, and courage. Smith is a public service professor in the School of Social Welfare at the University at Albany and a former member of Albany’s Common Council.

Please RSVP here; seating is limited.

Caffè Lena to present poet Marilyn McCabe March 4
On Wednesday, March 4, Caffè Lena will present a poetry reading by Marilyn McCabe. An open reading will follow. Doors open for sign-ups at 7 p.m., and the readings will start at 7:30. The host for the event will be Carol Graser and the cost is $5. Sponsored by Northshire Bookstore.

Marilyn McCabe’s poems can be found in literary journals on line and in print. Her book of poems, Perpetual Motion, is available through publisher The Word Works or at Small Press Distribution, www.spdbooks.org. Her videopoems can be seen on www.vimeo.com/marmccabe. She blogs about writing and reading at marilynonaroll.wordpress.com.

Caffè Lena is located at 47 Phila Street in Saratoga Springs: (518) 583-0022, www.caffelena.org

“Out of the Mouths of Babes” at Berkshire Festival of Women Writers March 7
In this fourth year of “Out of the Mouths of Babes,” at the Berkshire Festival of Women Writers on March 7, a variety of writers and performers will illume the iconic “village” of people who help raise families – however imperfect. Whether rural or urban, many mothers live in community but experience relative isolation. The quest of Out is to “take the maternal out of the kitchen and into the world” to inspire, maintain, and celebrate the community-supported creative life of women.

Suzi Banks Baum, the event organizer, has spent the past several years cultivating women’s voices through writing. Her drive came from her own “longing that had been masked by the chaos of motherhood.” Realizing women needed their own incubator to create, she formed The Powder Keg Sessions, a series of writing groups. She also edited An Anthology of Babes: 36 Women Give Motherhood a Voice and is currently on a book tour, offering space for women around the country to express their voices through writing. This summer, she’ll take it to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, where she grew up.

“My desire is to spread the roots of this community past Berkshire County,” says Banks Baum. “Women the world over are stymied by a silent desperation that keeps them quiet. Whatever their life conditions, the common thread is a societal underestimation of the value of motherhood and of women’s lives in general. My quest is for women to access and nurture their inner resolve, to take a stand for their stories that are news to the world. For this, they must hear from other women.”

A variety of writers and performers, including Banks Baum, will present their work:

  • Sarah Hains DiFazio is a second-grade teacher, community leader and blogger at MommaStrong.com.
  • Amy Dryansky’s newest poetry collection, Grass Whistle, received a Massachusetts Book Award. She blogs about the territory of mother/artist/poet at Pokey Mama.
  • Nichole Dupont writes about “the snarkier side of rural, single motherhood” and has been published in Newsday, Huffington Post and Berkshire Magazine.
  • Janet Reich Elsbach blogs about living on a small ludicrous farm and feeding a family of five at A Raisin & A Porpoise.
  • Lorrin Krouss used to work in publishing and was inspired to write by the Berkshire Festival of Women Writers. Her first essay has already been anthologized.
  • Serene Mastrianni is a registered pharmacist who also created and co-hosts the long-running weekly radio broadcast Radio2Women.
  • Lynnette (Lucy) Najimy and her film company, Beansprout Productions, use the power of story to bridge the gap between people across social divides.
  • Rachel Siegel trained at the Royal Academy of Drama and has performed widely in the United States and UK.
  • Leigh Strimbeck is co-founder of the WAM Theatre and Artist in Residence at Russell Sage College, teaching in the theater and WORLD programs.

In addition to the live portion, there will be art by Berkshire women and a short film on the theme of “If she can, I can!” Copies of An Anthology of Babes will also be available for purchase. Bedtime snacks and socializing will close the evening. “Out of the Mouths of Babes” will be at Dewey Memorial Hall, Sheffield, MA on Saturday, March 7. It will start at 7 p.m., and a $10 suggested donation at the door will help fund the production, as well as support the Berkshire Festival of Women Writers. Pajamas are perfect attire. To learn more, contact Suzi at (413) 429-1799 or suzi@laundrylinedivine.com.

Second Sunday Open Mic for Poetry & Prose: March 8
The next “Second Sunday Open Mic for Poetry and Prose” will be Sunday, March 8, at The Arts Center of the Capital Region, 265 River Street, Troy, NY. Bring two poems or five minutes of prose to read. After March, we have only three more dates left:  April 12, May 10 and June 14.  Co-hosted by Nancy Klepsch and Dan Wilcox.

Arthur’s Market Open Mic to feature Bob Sharkey March 11
Second Wednesday open mic and featured poet March 11 at Arthur’s Market & Café, 35 N. Ferry Street, Schenectady. Featured poet: Bob Sharkey. Bob’s publications include Main Street Rag, Plainsongs, Pudding and his initial collection, a chapbook entitled The Yellow Fairy.

Hosted by Catherine Norr. Come listen and share in a warm welcoming venue. Good food and beverages available.

March 17 deadline for Schoharie Crossing 2015 Writing Contest
There are three categories for the Schoharie Crossing 2015 Writing Contest: child (8-12 years old), young adult (13-17) and adult (17+).

Option #1:
This entry appears on Friday, September 10, in a diary kept by a resident of Fort Hunter in 1869: “It has Rained all day today and I helped…Eb. Howards…and the …Websters also[.]  I shall never forget while I live let it Be long or short what I herd this Day.” No further mention appears in the diary after this, and there is nothing in the days leading up to it that would give any good clues.  Using a creative approach and knowledge of the canal era in Fort Hunter, develop a story about what it is the diarist might have heard.

Option #2:
The Erie Canal operated from early spring to late fall. Occasionally however, barges didn’t make it through before the water froze for the winter.  That is what happened to the line boat, “Elizabeth” operated by the Brown family in 1858. Winnie is now twelve and along with her brothers Albert (14 yrs old) and Jason (8 yrs old), they help their parents haul freight and passengers along the canal between Albany & Buffalo.  Stuck on the frozen canal near Canal town with their four mules (Daisy, Buttercup, Midnight and Magic) until the spring thaw, the family will have to find a way to earn a living and survive. Write a story telling about how they and their mules spend their days until spring.

Option #3:
In recent years archaeological exploration has yielded new information regarding 18th Century Fort Hunter.  Here are three artifacts that were discovered on site: A ring, a silver nose bob, and a black bear tooth.  These  are available to be viewed in the exhibit at the Visitor Center—call if you would like to stop in to see them.  Using one, two or all three of these artifacts, create a compelling story.  Use your own writing voice and place the setting within the 18th century Mohawk Valley frontier.

Here are the rules/guidelines:

  • Submissions must be in by 5 p.m. on March 17.
  • Please, only one entry per person.
  • Please provide with your submission your name, age category, contact information including mailing address and telephone number. Submissions can be dropped off to the site, mailed or sent via email.
  • All submissions must be legible (typed double space preferred) and the pages numbered.
  • Submit to Janice M. Fontanella, Schoharie Crossing, P.O. Box 140, Fort Hunter, NY 12069; janice.fontanella@parks.ny.gov

PRIZE WINNERS will receive:

  • Child: $25 Fulton Montgomery Regional Chamber of Commerce Gift Checks
  • Young Adult: $50
  • Adult: $100

Feel free to illustrate your story, however they are not necessary. If there are any questions or comments, or you would like more historical context or information for your writing, please contact us at Schoharie Crossing via phone: (518) 829-7516.

Third Thursday to feature poet Andy Fogle March 19
Poet Andy Fogle will read from his work at the Social Justice Center, 33 Central Avenue, Albany, on Thursday, March 19, at 7:30 p.m. Andy Fogle grew up in Virginia Beach, lived for 13 years in the DC area and has now been upstate for 10 years, teaching at Bethlehem Central High School and chipping away at a PhD in Education. He has published five chapbooks of poetry and a variety of nonfiction.

A reading by a local or regional poet is held each Third Thursday at the Social Justice Center. The event includes an open mic for audience members to read. Sign-up starts at 7 p.m., with the reading beginning at 7:30.  The host of the readings is Albany poet and photographer Dan Wilcox.  The suggested donation is $3, which helps support this and other poetry programs of the Poetry Motel Foundation and the work of the Social Justice Center.  For more information about this event, contact Dan Wilcox, (518) 482-0262; dwlcx@earthlink.net.

Vermont author creates March 21 retreat to inspire creativity
Writers, freelancers, poets and others are encouraged to attend a day-long retreat designed to assist them in overcoming blocks or resistance in the writing process. “Nourish, A Retreat for Writers” is designed to help writers care for themselves, according to author J.P. Choquette, who designed the one-day event. The retreat will be held in a spacious mansion in the quaint village of Enosburgh, Vermont, on March 21.

“I planned this one-day retreat to help fellow writers by providing the time and space needed to nurture creativity,” she said. “In a world that’s often busy and loud, it can be a challenge to find time to just be quiet and discover or re-discover the joy that comes from writing.” Choquette explained that the goal of the retreat is not to schmooze with editors and agents or worry about one’s career, but to feed creativity: “I want to work with writers to create plans for growing their creativity and their writing. This is best done by guiding writers in defining what blocks them and then create strategies to work around the blocks. It’s about helping them to blossom and strengthen their writing skills and to have fun along the way.”

The morning session will focus on a guided journaling session and on-site yoga class taught by a professional instructor. A spa-like, nourishing lunch will follow. The afternoon offers time for free-writing, creating a collage “story” without words and mini-coaching sessions with participants. “I have discovered that movement and other forms of art, such a painting and collage, both enhance your mental creativity and help your writing,” she explained.

Choquette is a writer of fiction and nonfiction works. She is the author of the guide The 15- Minute Novelist, How to Write Your First Book in Just 15 Minutes a Day. She is also a coach who helps other creatives build a strategy for successfully hurdling over stumbling blocks. Her most recent novel, Subversion, was published in late 2014. Registration is $249. Due to the nurturing atmosphere, spaces are limited. Registration can be found online at http://www.jpchoquette.com/registration-for-nourish-retreat.html

Technical writer job openings in Albany/Rensselaer
Documentation Strategies, Inc., is a leading provider of Information, Technology and Training services to public and private organizations.  Since 1981, Documentation Strategies has served clients throughout the U.S. from its headquarters in Albany/Rensselaer, New York.  We are certified as a Woman-owned Business Enterprise by New York State, the Port Authority of NY-NJ and WBENC.  In 2013 and again in 2014 DocStrats was named an INC. 500/5000 Fastest Growing companies in the US.

Documentation Strategies is seeking to fill two openings; both require at least three years technical writing, editing and proofreading experience:

  • We are representing our client, a national systems integrator, who is in search of a Technical Writer for a New York State (NYS) project.  This is a 3-6 month contract, based in the Albany, NY area and will require 100% on-site presence.
  • We are representing our client, a materials analysis equipment firm in need of a soft- and hardware Technical Writer to join its engineering team.  This is a full-time, permanent opportunity, based in the Albany, NY area and requires 100% on-site presence.  Relocation and sponsorship are not a consideration at this time.

There are detailed job descriptions for each. Experienced technical writers, please contact Carolyn Santiago, IT Recruiter with Documentation Strategies, at santiago@docstrats.com, or call (518) 432-1233 x32.